Missionary`s Colada

Here is a great drink, especially for the summer, created by my friend Emanuele Codispoti. It`s a tasty mix of the Pina Colada and the Missionary`s Downfall. Yep, what a drink marriage! the drink is so fresh and tasty!

Here is a little biography of Emanuele:

Emanuele was born in Rome and grow up in a small town in Calabria, south of Italy, He started to work in the hospitality business at an early age and started to work behind the bar in the early 2000`s. Researches about “tropical” drinks brouht him to discover Jeff Beachbum Berry and his books, Don the Beachcomber, Trader Vic and the Tiki cocktails. He fell into the “Tiki rabbit-hole” and it was love at first sight!

His obsession with faraway, exotic and mystery islands has its roots in his childood. As a child, and even before he was born, he listened to instrumental songs that his father listened to. Bands like Santo & Johnny, with their lap steel guitar did early on put their sound into the deepths of his mind. And Emanuele grew up with the myth of a Hawaiian paradise. There was something, like a recall, that attracted him towards a lost and mysterious world. As an adult and overcoming the fear of flying, he finally made his dream come true. He travelled across America to visit Tiki bars and sites. From San Francisco to Los Angeles and San Diego, from Maui and Ohau to New Orleans, from New York to Fort Lauderdale.

He have had the honor to be guest bartending at The Hukilau beside Daniele Dalla Pola (Nu Lounge Bar, Bologna and Esotico, Miami) for the past three years. Now he works at a Beach Club called Mana Nui Sand bar at Verdemare Beach, in a small town called Soverato in Southern Italy. And here is his drink:

Missionary`s Colada, by Emanuele Codispoti

1.5 oz light Puerto Rican rum (Bacardi Carta Blanca)
0.5 oz gold Cuban rum (Havana Club 3)
1 oz Re`al cream of coconut
0.25 oz Re`al ginger syrup
1 oz fresh lime juice
0.5 oz Alamea Peach Brandy liqueur
8 mint leaves
6 pineapple chunks
pinch of salt

Blend until liquid and the add 1 cup of crushed ice and blend again until smooth but not slushy.

Pour into a snifter and enjoy! garnish with mint. I also added a small strawberry… Note that the drink I made looks very green,  it´s due to that I took some extra (and very large) mint leaves, I`m a mint lover!

 

Tiki Lovers Pineapple Rum, the Circle of Tiki & Rum Camp Booklet

It`s time to talk about Tiki Lover`s rum again, I can`t believe it was eight (!) years ago that the first Tiki Lover`s rums was launched and I wrote about them. Where did the time go? scary! Anyway, I have noticed that people are talking about them on social media and since the last time they have also launched a pineapple rum, similar in style to the one from Plantation, the Stiggin`s Fancy. it`s similar but not quite the same, and the production methods, type of pineapple used and the flavor differ.

Curious as I am I did  taste them both side by side and noticed the differences but also some similarities. My conclusion is that one of them might be better suited for one specific drink and the other for another. Overall, I find the Tiki Lover`s to be very strong on the pineapple flavor, which makes it maybe more suitable for strong Tiki cocktails, while the Stiggin`s Fancy is lighter in flavor, more complex and refined.

Not sure how exactly the Tiki Lover`s team make their pineapple rum, all I know is that they use natural extracts from pineapples from South America. I`m not sure if the pineapples are fresh or baked before added to the rum, the description says “The  juice is extracted and some of its water content is reduced in order to not water down the rum.”

The rums used in the blend are aged and un-aged pot still rums from Hampden and Worthy Park, then 3 year old Barbados rum from Foursquare aged in former bourbon whiskey barrels (thumbs up for these rums!) and then some younger column still rums from Guyana and Trinidad and it`s a no-brainer which distilleries they must come from, namely DDL and Angostura.

In my opinion after I tried it in two Tiki cocktails – it`s a good start, but the pineapple flavor is strong and becomes a bit overpowering in the drinks and so you need to use it in small amounts. But it also depends on what you use with it. I haven`t tried it with a lot of different rums yet, it`s an ongoing process. But for what I used in these drinks, a small amount worked best and that`s when it did shine best, adding just enough of the flavor to stay balanced with the other ingredients.

The two drinks I made are these:

Hala Kahiki

1 oz Appleton Rare Blend, Jamaican rum
0.5 oz Coruba Dark, Jamaican rum
0.25 oz Tiki Lovers Pineapple rum
0.5 oz Alamea Hawaiian Coffee liqueur
1.5 oz fresh pineapple juice
0.75 oz fresh lime juice
0.5 oz banana syrup

Add all ingredients to a blender and flash-blend for 5 seconds with 1 cup of crushed ice. Pour into a Tiki mug. Garnish with a mini pineapple and a flower.

To make banana syrup: Add 2:1 amount of sugar to water, I used a light brown muscovado sugar. Add to a pan and heat up and stir until the sugar dissolves. Then add one banana that you mash a bit with a fork, cook the syrup a little bit for about a minute on medium heat. Take off the heat and let sit for an hour, then strain and bottle. I used 1 banana for about 1 cup of syrup.

I had a taste tester to help me give feedback on the drinks and his reaction to this drink was that “it tastes very exotic, the drink has layers and layers of flavor coming up and there`s something there I cannot really put my finger on… yeah, it´s exotic.”

Alamea Star

1.5 oz Clairin Sajous Haitian rhum
0.25 oz Tiki Lovers Pineapple rum
0.25 oz Green Chartreuse
0.5 oz Banana/Lemon Oleo Saccharum
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
Top with a little bit of Ting

Flash-blend with 1 cup crushed ice and pour into a double old fashioned glass. Top with a little bit of Ting (Jamaican grapefruit beverage) and garnish with pineapple chunks, lime slices and cinnamon dust on top.

For the Banana – Lemon Oleo Saccharum, there are plenty of recipes online. I used 1.5 oz superfine sugar per peeled lemon and banana. Cut the banana peels in smaller pieces.

My taste tester friend`s reaction to this drink was first a big smile on his face  🙂 then “yeah I like it, I like it a lot” –  it reminds me of a vacation to a special place, when we used to be sitting at the beach at sunset.

Glassware: Kahiko, designed by Daniele Dalla Pola for Libbey.

Tiki Lover`s Rum also have made a booklet called “Tiki Lovers Rum Camp” together with some very talented people. The booklet contains information about their rums, then there´s 27 “rum rhapsodies” recipes, aka “Exotic/Tiki Cocktails” both classic and new, with GORGEOUS garnish works and photography!

The Tiki Lovers brand is created band produced y Stephan Berg and Alexander Hauck. As well as the layout and design of the book, together with Jochen Hirschfeld, who also did the art direction and gorgeous photography. The illustrations were made by Anthony Carpenter, Tanja Hirschfeld and Rudi Skukalek, and the Tiki charts were made by Sven Kirsten.

They also made a collaboration with  Sven Kirsten who made a chart called the “Circle of Tiki” which is a guide showing which elements make a bar a Tiki bar,  using the Tiki figure as its main element. Around this main element, are supporting ideas circling around the main focus, the Tiki. The supporting ideas are up to personal preference, some like the rockabilly stuff, while others like the monsters and etc. You need to see the chart to fully get this!

One thing though, when I say “it´s up to personal preference” I don`t mean that with Tiki, anything goes! it doesn`t. The circling elements need of course to have a connection to the Tiki culture and what those circling elements are is written in the chart.

There´s also a simplified version of the “The Evolution of Polynesian pop” chart which was first put into the Book of Tiki which was published in the year 2000.

The Tiki Camp booklet can be downloaded on Tiki Lovers website but the pdf version lacks the “Circle of Tiki” and the “The Evolution of Polynesian pop” charts. The Circle of Tiki can be found on the webpage though. The booklet was part of a Tiki Tour in California called The Californian “Van Hagen Punch” Tour visiting various Tiki bars during november. How I wish I could live in a country where things like that happens! but i`m really glad to have this Tiki booklet.

 

 

Re-posting: Joint Barbados GI Statement From Mount Gay, Foursquare & St Nicholas Abbey by Rum Revelations

I usually don`t repost other`s posts here but this time I want to state my support for this topic which I feel is important and which couldn`t be said any better than what is written by Ivar de Laat who run the Rum Revelations blog. I`m not re-posting the whole content but a part and those who are interested in reading the rest may head over to the Rum Revelations blog.

Joint Barbados GI Statement From Mount Gay, Foursquare & St Nicholas Abbey

For a while now, the people of Barbados have been trying to implement a GI for their rum. GI stands for Geographical Indication. “The use of a GI may act as a certification that the product possesses certain qualities, is made according to traditional methods, or enjoys a certain reputation, due to its geographical origin.“

There are four distilleries on the island, namely Mount Gay, Foursquare, St Nicholas Abbey and West Indies Rum Distillery. The government of Barbados wants all four to agree on a draft GI that can be forwarded to the government for consideration. This has turned out to be a difficult task. Three distilleries are in agreement on what the GI should look like, WIRD is not. They were recently taken over by French company Maison Ferrand, known in the rum world through their Plantation brand.

Similar to what’s happening in Jamaica, where Ferrand is trying to change the existing GI (more about that in this article), they want to be able to add sugar to their rum (20g/l), which is what they do to many of their products. This is something completely foreign to Barbados rum and therefore unacceptable to the other distilleries. It doesn’t stop there. They also want to be able to use any water source, any cask type for ageing, any yeast type and age the rum anywhere in the world after 1 year in Barbados. Apart from the one year ageing, it takes all geographical components out of the Geographical Indication. Essentially making it a generic rum that could be made anywhere.

Click here for an article where Ferrand explains their position, including very far fetched historic “facts” to motivate why everything should be allowed in the GI. Alexandre Gabriel, owner of Ferrand, later explained on his own Facebook page that they want to be able to add 20g/l of sugar to Barbados rum. The historical “fact” for this one is that caramel colouring has been used for centuries in Barbados rum, which leaves a trace of sugar. Not mentioning the fact that caramel colouring is bitter and the sugar it leaves is a microscopic amount. It was never meant to sweeten the rum (it doesn’t), just colour it. My personal opinion is that these kind of statements are propaganda at best.

As I mentioned in my post on Long Pond rums, a GI as proposed by the other 3 distilleries, wouldn’t stop Ferrand from doing their experiments. They simply can’t label it as Barbados rum.

Barbados rum, like Jamaica rum, is an institute…..they are part of the foundation of rum and should be cherished, loved, respected and protected. It’s a real shame that a company which constantly says they respect the terroir of all the different rums, while taking these same rums further and further away from their terroir with all their experiments, is able to stall this process of protecting Barbados rum, purely for financial gain. I feel for the people of Barbados, who should be the ones deciding what happens with their rum tradition.

Foursquare, Mount Gay and St Nicholas Abbey have come up with a press release. Here below it is in its entirety, head over to Rum Revelations blog and scroll down to read the press release:

BARBADOS DISTILLERS UNITE IN PUSH FOR A GI

Santa`s Potion of Danger

It was that time of the year again, the Libbey Glass Europe Glassology Christmas Tiki Cocktail Challenge which they announce on their page on Facebook and where you can express interest in participating. They pick 50 contestants that have a chance to be part of this fun competition and win fine prizes from Libbey.

This year my drink Santa`s Potion of Danger took first place! What a great way to start 2020! and I want to share the recipe here. It`s lenghty but not difficult, and not as complicated as it may seem!

It`s a fruity, spicy, refreshing Tiki cocktail with a pronounced tropical “zest” from the cranberry reduction, with a bit of tartness but without being actually sour, and it´s sooo deceptive… it goes down easily but it contains three of strong.

Santa´s Potion of Danger

15 ml/05 oz passionfruit juice

15 ml/05 oz fresh pineapple juice

30 ml/1 oz fresh lime juice

30 ml/1 oz cranberry and ginger reduction

15 ml/05 oz “Santa`s Spices*

45 ml/1.5 oz Jamaican rum, I used dr Bird (or use Hampden (regular or overproof, your choice) or Smith & Cross)

30 ml/1 oz aged rhum agricole, I used Héritiers Madkaud “Castelmore” cask VSOP

30 ml/1 oz Alamea Spiced Rum

Float of pineapple infused Campari served in a passionfruit (or lime) shell on top of the ice to be floated on the ice before drinking.

Method: Add all ingredients except the pineapple infused Campari into a blender and blend at high speed for 5 seconds with 2.5dl crushed ice. Pour straight into a Kahiko Zombie glass. Top up with more crushed ice to fill. Garnish with the float of pineapple infused Campari and a flaming MK KD Grider Tiki Torch. A warning: these mini tiki torches get VERY hot after burning, so do not touch the torch part when removing it from the glass before drinking.

Serve alight and admire the flaming torch for a little, then remove it, float the pineapple infused Campari and enjoy!

Pineapple infused Campari: Add equal parts fresh crushed pineapple to Campari in a mixing glass and cover with a foil or plastic wrap. Let sit for 24 hours in the fridge, then strain as fine as you can.

Santa`s Spices: Lightly toast 1 bigger or 2 small crushed cinnamon sticks, 20 cloves and 2 star anise, se aside. Make a 2:1 simple syrup with demerara sugar and mash one 1/2 banana into it, add the toasted spices and one slit up Tahitian vanilla bean. Let it simmer for a couple minutes, take off heat and let sit for at least 30 minutes to cool and marry the flavors.

Cranberry and ginger reduction: Reduce 2 dl natural cranberry juice without too much sugar together with 4 cm long and 2 cm thick sliced ginger root until you have what you need for this drink, 30 ml/1 oz. Discard the ginger slices and cool. It should get a sharp strong ginger bite and pronounced tartness from the cranberry juice.

Cheers!

The Tiki Cocktail Challenge is back!

 

If you`re into tiki and exotic cocktails you might already be familiar with the Tiki Cocktail Challenge by “El Nova” (@el_nova55 and @tikicommando (Tacoma Cabana & Devil`s Reef) on instagram) which are weekly challenges to re-create or make a twist of, or go to a bar and order, a specific tiki cocktail and then post up a nice picture of it. The best picture wins. It`s all for fun and challenge your creative mode. It was a while ago (2015) but the Tiki cocktail challenge is back again and in full swing!

The pictures and recipes are posted in the “Tiki Recipes” group on Facebook and on Instagram with the hashtag that is set for each specific challenge for example #demeraradryfloatchallenge2019″ etc.

We are three weeks into it already and I made these drinks so far, my first entry, was for the “151 Swizzle” Challenge:

151 Tribute Swizzle Number Five

The recipe is based on the  “Tribute to The Mai-Kai’s 151 Swizzle”v.4 by The Atomic Grog, my favorite tiki blog on this planet! but the grenadine is switched out for fassionola (homemade) and the ratios are upped as well while the sugar syrup is omitted.  Then 0.5 oz Batavia arrack is added for a subtle layer of extra funk.

1 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fassionola (BG Reynold`s, homemade or other quality fassionola)
0.25 oz falernum
0.25 oz cinnamon syrup
1 oz Lemon Hart 151 overproof rum
1 oz Dr Bird jamaican rum
0.5 oz Batavia arrack (By the Dutch or Batavia Arrack van Oosten)
1 dash Angostura bitters
2 drops Absinthe

Pulse blend with 1 cup of crushed ice for 5 seconds and pour into a chilled metal swizzle cup, other swizzle glass or pilsner glass, adding more crushed ice to fill. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

The mini tiki torch is from Grider Adventure Art.

Beachcomber`s Secret

My 2nd entry was for the “Beachcomber`s Gold” Challenge, I changed the recipe a bit and it became a darker more “secretive” take on the gold.

1 oz Coruba Dark 
1/4 oz Lemon Hart 151
1/4 oz Barbancourt 8
1/2 oz fresh lime juice
1/4 oz demerara syrup
1/4 oz Hibiscus grenadine
6 drops Pernod or Absinthe
2 drops almond extract
2 oz (1/4 cup) crushed ice

Flash blend for 5 seconds and strain into a saucer glass lined
with an ice shell forming a hood over the glass. Serve with short straws.

Demerara Dry Float (From Beachbum Berry’s Intoxica!)

2.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1.5 oz passion fruit syrup
0.25 oz sugar syrup
1 oz Demerara rum
0.25 oz 151 Demerara rum
0.25 oz maraschino liqueur

Shake everything, except 151 rum, with ice cubes. Strain into a double old-fashioned glass filled with crushed ice (or lined with an ice shell). Carefully float 151. Do not stir.

By Don the Beachcomber, circa 1941.

Ice shell:

The ice shell creation in the  “Demerara Dry Float” is a bit different from the one in “Beachcomber´s Secret, with an ice shell that is not tilted to created a “hood” over the drink. It just sits upright and is also a little bit smaller or lower than the classic tilted ice shell you can see in the “Beachcomber`s Gold”. Drinks with these types of ice shells are usually served in a flaired glass,

In the old days of Don the Beachcomber these ice shells was a marvel to behold. They were made to perfection with very finely shaved ice creating very thin “walls” and the walls were not “buckled” in the way you see them today with crushed ice, instead they were smooth like silk! at least that`s what I`ve seen in a video.

I have yet to accomplish an ice shell that look that way, that`s partly due to me not having an ice shaver and partly that a lot of training is needed. It`s not easy to get them to look so perfect. When you make a hooded ice shell you need to consider the temperature of the ice. it need to be a little “soft”to easily mold, but not too soft and melting. Then it need to be as fine as you can get it.

You need a flaired glass and you fill it up with the shaved (preferably, and if not, crushed) ice and with your hands (or with something round) form a hole in the bottom that you press with your fingers and slowly tilt upwards on the side of the glass until a hood is formed. Add a little more ice to the bottom to”hold” the hood.

Then you put the glass in the freezer for at least 1 hour before pouring the drink in it. When you make the non-hooded ice shell you just make the hole in the bottom pressing the ice upwards on all sides around the glass and put it in the freezer and that´s it.

That was all for now, if you want to join in on the challenge or check out all the other amazing drinks go to the Facebook group “Tiki Recipes” and also check out the hashtags #151swizzlechallenge2019″, “beachcombersgoldchallenge2019” and “demeraradryfloatchallenge2019” on Instagram.

Tiki Coquitonaut for the Christmas Holidays!

I just got the idea to mix together the Coquito with the Coconaut and thus the Tiki Coquitonaut was born. It`s a handy beverage for the holidays because it´s not only very tasty,  it`s so easy to make and to bring along when you visit friends and family.

I made this tikified Coquito in honor of the cool guys @ Los del Caribe in Peru! Los del Caribe are are two guys discovering the secret mixes of the Amazonas and the Caribbean. They are going to make a trip throughout the Amazon and the Caribbean to find new flavors, colors, cultures and traditions that they will bring into the art behind the bar. You can find them on instagram at @losdelcaribeloco

Tiki Coquitonaut (makes a small bottle)

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2 oz Alamea Spiced rum
2 oz Plantation OFTD overproof rum
2 oz Coruba Dark Jamaican rum
0.5 oz Alamea Hawaiian Coffee Liqueur
0.25 oz Alamea Pimento Rum Liqueur
2 oz sweet condensed milk
2 oz Cream of Coconut
12 oz Tahitian vanilla milk
6 oz Coconut milk

Add to blender and blend well, bottle and put in the fridge to get cold. Serve in a chilled glass with a dust of cinnamon powder and grated nutmeg on top.

*Tahitian vanilla milk – Pour 2 cups of milk into a bottle with 2-3 Tahitian vanilla beans, cut in half. Let sit for 2 hours or overnight.

Glass: Tiki split glass from Libbey
Moai mug: Maka Tiki
Tiki carving by Samuele de Vietro

You may substitute the rums if you cannot find them with others, try to keep it in the aged Jamaican pot still style kicked up with some overproof and something with natural spice for best result.

Aloha and Mele Kalikimaka!

“Mele Kalikimaka is the thing to say on a bright Hawaiian Christmas day. That’s the island greeting that we send to you From the land where palm trees sway”

“Mele Kalikimaka” is a Hawaiian-themed Christmas song written in 1949 by Robert Alex Anderson. The song takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase Mele Kalikimaka, meaning “Merry Christmas”