Tiki Coquitonaut for the Christmas Holidays!

I just got the idea to mix together the Coquito with the Coconaut and thus the Tiki Coquitonaut was born. It`s a handy beverage for the holidays because it´s not only very tasty,  it`s so easy to make and to bring along when you visit friends and family.

I made this tikified Coquito in honor of the cool guys @ Los del Caribe in Peru! Los del Caribe are are two guys discovering the secret mixes of the Amazonas and the Caribbean. They are going to make a trip throughout the Amazon and the Caribbean to find new flavors, colors, cultures and traditions that they will bring into the art behind the bar. You can find them on instagram at @losdelcaribeloco

Tiki Coquitonaut (makes a small bottle)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is Tiki-Coquitonaut-1.jpg

2 oz Alamea Spiced rum
2 oz Plantation OFTD overproof rum
2 oz Coruba Dark Jamaican rum
0.5 oz Alamea Hawaiian Coffee Liqueur
0.25 oz Alamea Pimento Rum Liqueur
2 oz sweet condensed milk
2 oz Cream of Coconut
12 oz Tahitian vanilla milk
6 oz Coconut milk

Add to blender and blend well, bottle and put in the fridge to get cold. Serve in a chilled glass with a dust of cinnamon powder and grated nutmeg on top.

*Tahitian vanilla milk – Pour 2 cups of milk into a bottle with 2-3 Tahitian vanilla beans, cut in half. Let sit for 2 hours or overnight.

Glass: Tiki split glass from Libbey
Moai mug: Maka Tiki
Tiki carving by Samuele de Vietro

You may substitute the rums if you cannot find them with others, try to keep it in the aged Jamaican pot still style kicked up with some overproof and something with natural spice for best result.

Aloha and Mele Kalikimaka!

“Mele Kalikimaka is the thing to say on a bright Hawaiian Christmas day. That’s the island greeting that we send to you From the land where palm trees sway”

“Mele Kalikimaka” is a Hawaiian-themed Christmas song written in 1949 by Robert Alex Anderson. The song takes its title from the Hawaiian phrase Mele Kalikimaka, meaning “Merry Christmas”

Zulu Bitters – Bitters with Brazilian Heart and Soul

Zulu Bitters

Two years ago was the first time I tried the Zulu aromatic bitters made by Laèrcio Zulu, bartender and mixologist from Brazil. I was always so fascinated by all the things he did, especially with all the fruits, roots, tinctures etc he did experiment with, and he did experiment a lot!

Brazil is a country that really has an abundance of interesting fruits, roots and herbs, a lot I have never even heard about much less tried.

Zulu worked in São Paulo as a bartender for six years and one of the bars where he worked at was the Noh Bar, developing their cocktails and learnt to use such techniques as carbonization, aging and smoking. He also won the best bartender in Brazil in 2014 in the Diageo World Class, at the time working at La Maison Est Tombée.

He is now working with cocktail consultation through his brand Custom Cocktails – Bar Marketing, throughout Brazil and also making his bitters – Zulu Bitters.

Zulu is a master in making amazing cocktails, very often with his own exotic house made ingredients. The bitters I tried back then, this was 2013, was his first aromatic bitters and which have developed unto what I now have in hand along with a 5 year commemorative bitters, a barrel aged and an orange bitters.

A lot have happened since then!

Here he tells his his own story:

Zulu

The first Brazilian bitter brand with Brazilian heart and soul took it`s first steps in September 2010, that`s when the Zulu Bitter brand was born and developed along with the career of its creator; Zulu Bartender. So, lets talk about this guy and his amazing journey.

Laércio Zulu, mixologist, was born in the state of Bahia (Brazil) and has been living in Sao Paulo now for 6 years. His work thrives on the values and appreciation for Brazilian ingredients, a reflection of his constant trips inside Brazil’s vast territory seeking for new flavors and sensations. This gives Zulu great knowledge about some ingredients that are unusual for the general public, but very common for the regular man in a small towns around his country.

Thinking about #valoresnacionais (national values), Zulu chases not only unusual ingredients, but also different ways to produce his cocktails, from using ants from the Amazon rainforest to shake cocktails in capoeira rhythm. Every detail designed to give classic cocktails a Brazilian twist.

He says: “My biggest goal is to show the real Brazilian flavors, not only by giving another direction for the use of tropical ingredients, that are, of course, very common in Brazil, but also going way further than that.”

This crazy guy got out of his small town in Bahia to be a bartender in Sao Paulo in 2009, taking American-style bartenders classes in schools like Bertones Bartenders and Flair Brazil, both already extinct, and started working in that same year.

From this point on, he got more and more passionate for mixology and immersed himself on self-learning and reading about it in every book or piece of information he could put his hand on. In the next year, things started getting bitter (LOL).

Zulu 2

Before even begin his research of national ingredients, he felt the need to understand more about the history of mixology, how it was developed and how to produce ingredients from scratch.

He dived into classic mixology books, such as Gary Regan’s “The Joy of Mixology”, Tony Abou-Ganim’s “The Modern Mixology; David Wondrich’s “Imbibe”, Dale Degroff’s “The Essential Cocktails” and, more important, the very first cocktails guide: Jerry Thomas’ “The Bartender’s Guide” 1862.

All these readings helped Zulu to make sense not only how the consumer behavior changed through the years and how each region had its characteristics for consumption of mixed drinks. Most of all, he made sense of the real value of mixology and became fascinated with evolution of the techniques and how the mixed drinks took a very interesting place in society.

That’s when the so acclaimed seasoning (Bitters) steps in.

During the beggining of mixology, to talk about “bitters” was to talk about a “bartender’s secret”. It was the “special touch” for cocktails, responsible for bartender’s authenticity and personality in each cocktail. This concept sounded very well with Zulu and the idea of creating and producing his own bitters was born.

In the following article, Zulu explains his process:

For the technical side of production, I started producing a series of known recipes to understand how the infusions of different ingredients worked. These recipes are still very famous, like Jerry Thomas Own Decanter Bitters, Boker’s Bitters and Gaz Regan Orange Bitters. I did this for innumerous times to get sense of the balance of the ingredients.

For each sample of the first batches (back in 2011), I always shared with professional bartenders who had my respect and admiration like Marcio Silva, Marcelo Vasconcelos, Marcelo Serrano, James Guimarães and Talita Simões to have an orientation, mostly because, until then, I had not tried many different bitter’s brands. The positive feedbacks were a great motivation.

After that, I started to buy several bitters online, because, in Brazil, Angostura Bitters was the only brand you could find. So, everytime I could find a different one I restlessly tried it and ran to my kitchen to produce new recipes for my bitters.

By 2012, I gave up on any imported ingredients, focusing just on local ingredients.

Zulu bitters collage

During my experiences, I divided three groups of ingredients to get the recipe I believed to be the face of Brazilian spice: As I tried commercial bitters with amazing textures, I added Brazil Nuts to the body of ingredients of Zulu Bitters. That gives the viscosity and shine I wanted in the mixture.

For aromatic complexity, cinnamon, guarana seeds and amburana seeds stand out. For color, jurema preta and cashew were up to the task. I believe that these three pillars are the main factors to say that Zulu Bitters does have Brazilian heart and soul… because to explain the “Axe” and the “ginga” that goes inside that little bottle, one have to know Brazil.”

That`s a great story isn´t it? I had to ask Zulu what axe and ginga means, and a little about his use of ants in cocktails, because I find that very interesting (especially after I first tried amazing foraged cocktails made by Marcello Biancaniello with ants beer in them) which were some of the most amazing cocktails I have ever tried, and he explains it like this;

“I used Amazon ants in a cocktail during a presentation at the World Class 2014 Finals, in London. My intention was to combine the citric touch of the ants with my recipe of Gold Label Reserve Whisky, umbu reduction (Umbu is tropical fruit from Bahia) Abatetuda molass (an Amazonic island) and Zulu Aromatic Bitters.

Axe represents energy, strength. The energy giving and receiving. It is directly connected with the lifestyle of Brazilian people who believes in spirituality from african religions. Ginga is a lifestyle, its the Brazilian “swag”. Its also the movement that preceeds the capoeira game. Very related with people from Bahia”

So, on my table here I now have four of his bitters, the aromatic, the barrel aged, 5 year commemorative and orange bitters, i`m gonna try to describe their flavors:

Aromatic:

Zulu Bitters aromatic

Very much what the name says – aromatic! there´s a lot of roots flavors and what I´d call “dark spices” but the color is light brown, it´s earhty, aromatic and at the same time brilliant and lively. It has notes of roast cocoa, dark chocolate, vanilla, coffee, cinnamon, banana and dried spices.

A little bit bitter yes but not too much and well balanced, I  don`t feel any specific spice taking over.

I can also imagine these amazing bitters in cooking, not just cocktail making! some of these aromatics on meat before grilling…

Barrel aged:

Zulu bitters Barrel aged

Woody and spicy, but definetily woody, well,  “barrel aged” right? but there could be other woods and roots in it as well, interesting flavor and very aromatic, very nice bitters. It has some kinda coffee and raw cocoa notes too, at least to me. The color is light brown.

Orange:

Zulu Bitters orange

Brilliant! with a tingling on the tongue! very strong flavor of not only orange peel but theres a lot going on in this little bottle. Mainly composed of Bahia orange peel, guarana seeds, cumin and balsam bark but there´s more than that. The color is dark orange bordering to brown, and there´s hints of wood and roots.

It´s very tasty bitters. Perfect for lighter cocktails and would be great in some desserts as well and with grilled seafood.

These bitters aromatics are intense!

5 Year Commemorative:

Zulu Bitters 5

Here´s astringency and very herbal flavor, my guess is that there´s some mimosa or chamomille in it. These bitters are aromatic and spicy and very very herbal, also the color, it´s light greenish-yellow.

I also have to mention his first aromatic bitters, they have a totally different flavor than the aromatics of today, it´s a different kind of woody flavor in them and they are still tasty after 2 years.

I must say that these bitters are all amazing and some of the best i`ve tried so far! he sure knows what he is doing.

Here´s a super cool cocktail from Laercio:

Boca de Lobo

Boca de Lobo collage

50 ml Cachaça Leblon
20 ml homemade Castanha-do-pará cordial (Brazil nut cordial)
15 ml lime juice
15 ml Catuaba (a Brazilian bark)
4 dash Zulu Orange Bitters

Shaken together and served in a tiki mug with crushed ice.

I haven`t tried it yet, because I don`t have the Brazil nut cordial or catuaba beverage, which is a drink made from extracts of a plant found in the Amazon forest which also is an aphrodisiac and a famous one too, and it`s sold in bark form, as tea or beverage.

And how do you make a Brazil nut cordial? (here´s for going out and google again… :-)) but the recipe can also be seen as inspiration for using these bitters and the bark can maybe be substituted with something else or be omitted if you cannot find it.

Brazil nut cordial can maybe be switched for a homemade Brazil nut orgeat instead? it would totally change the flavor but it´s easy to make and Brazil nuts are usually available and I believe it would still be a good drink. Just don´t forget to change the ratios too!

I`d maybe do 2 oz of cachaca, 0.5 oz Brazil nut orgeat, 0.5 oz lime juice, 2 dash Zulu orange bitters and instead of the catuaba bark tincture, 2 dashes of the barrel aged bitters.

So where can people get these bitters from? because they cannot also be substituted… and frankly I have never tried any other bitters that are anywhere close to the flavors of these and naturally so since these contains local Brazilian ingredients.

inquiries: zuluheadbartender@gmail.com and here is his Facebook page.

And with these interesting and flavorful bitters I had to make a cocktail or two of my own to try them out:

Banana Daiquiri

Grilled Banana Daiquiri 2

2 oz aged Cachaca

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz banana syrup (made with grilled banana heated up with and then cooled in dark sugarcane syrup (you can sub with Giffard Banane de Brézil but check ratios if you do)

4 dashes Zulu orange bitters

Shake with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail coupe.

Turns out rich and flavorful.

Zulu Coconaut

Zulu Coconaut 2

This is a classic Coconaut with the addition of  Zulu Aromatic Bitters.

2 oz Cream Of Coconut (Real or Lopez)

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

2 oz  Jamaican dark rum

4 dashes Zulu Aromatic Bitters

Shake with ice and strain into a coconut vessel or glass

with crushed ice.

Garnish with tropical orchid

Very very tasty!

Zulu Bitters aromatic new and old2

The old and the new aromatic bitters.

Hamilton Jamaica, Demerara and Saint Lucia Rums!

Hamilton Rums

Up for review I have here three bottles of Hamilton rums from the Ministry of Rum Collection – a pot still Saint Lucian rum from 2006, aged 7 years, the Jamaican Pot Still Black Rum and then the 86 proof Demerara rum. These are rums I was wanting to review for a very long time but couldn`t get to do until now.

Ed Hamilton, who I first encountered at his Ministry of Rum website back in 2008 and who was my first rum mentor sailed the Caribbean for many years searching for rums, visiting distilleries and sampling rums and by the beginning of 2000 started to import rhum agricoles from the French Caribbean and imported rhums such as Neisson and La Favorite.

He also wrote rum books, Rums of the Eastern Caribbean and The Complete Guide to Rum: A Guide to Rums of the World that were published in the 1990s.

And now he hand select rums for his own Hamilton label and is the one who brought us the Hamilton 151 Demerara to help us survive the for now (and maybe forever) not longer produced Lemon Hart 151 (well,  the US for now since LH151 is still not yet dried up in Europe – but hurry up Ed and get it to Europe too before it runs out….) and as for the rest of the world I have no idea about the LH151 situation but I guess it´s pretty non existant?

The bottles are very nice, dark, and “rum looking” and the labels are beautiful with an old style map of the island or country producing the rums in the center.

Hamilton rums collage

Saint Lucian Pot Still, 2006, 63.8%

Starting with the one I was the most curious about, the pot still Saint Lucian. Each of the Saint Lucia Pot Still rums in the Ministry of Rum Collection were distilled and aged in Saint Lucia then shipped to the US in the barrels in which they were aged. For details of each of these rums can be found on the Caribbean Spirits webpage.

The molasses used at St Lucia Distillers was sourced from Guyana and contained 65% dissolved sugar, one of the highest sugar contents of any molasses found in the Caribbean. The high sugar content is attributed to the age of the Guyanese sugar mill. But it doesn’t matter what the sugar content of the molasses / juice is, after distillation there is no residual sugar left in the spirit and what comes out of the still is dry.

And the rum doesn`t taste very sweet, it more tastes like real unadultered rum, and there was no caramel color or flavoring of any kind added to this rum either.

I was met with a very pleasant nose of plenty of mature macerated tropical fruits, oak, orange peel, vanilla and creamy butter….

But taking a sip, be prepared for a taste chock…. it`s an explosion of heavy pot still punch and strong flavors! but the the thing that really hits you comes after when a dry earthy astringency lets itself be known….which immediately brought my mind to rhum agricole where I think I mostly have found these kind of flavors but here`s a rum made from molasses.

And it`s so very different!! really intriguing…It has flavors of the same tropical fruits i found in the nose, and then oak, leather, tannins, spice and dark plums….paired with this dry earhty astringency remniscent of an aged rhum agricole….it`s an amazing rum! heavy and vibrant.

Re-visitng this rum the next day and this time with a few drops of water I don`t think very much changed…more than that the astringency became even more pronounced….maybe it got a little smoother in appearance.

Oh my….this is very interesting rum!

I happen to really like strong rums with character and so I have no problem liking this one. Another thing that I like is the transparency which Ed puts out on the bottle label, it describes exactly what this rum is all about and at the Ministry of Rum website you can read a lot more!

Heavy rums like this tend to be a bit difficult to use in cocktails if used alone and so I think this one might be best together with something that can tame it a little bit….

Hamilton Jamaican Pot Still Black Rum, 46.5%

The next one is the Jamaican pot still black rum, this one is a blend of light, very light and heavy pot still rums from the Worthy Park Estate where rum has been made since 1670. And it has been colored with a double-strength black sugar-based caramel.

Here`s for a very pungent nose…mashed overripe bananas and other tropical fruits, burnt sugar, heavy molasses, hints of wood and pineapple….it`s a funky smell that attacks your senses.

But contrary to the taste chock of the Saint Lucian rum this one enters very smoothly…and that surprised me…

Fruity notes with overripe banana, pineapple and charred wood, molasses and tropical leaves. It`s not an elegant rum, nor is it light despite using two lighter pot still rums in the blend, but it´s smooth with a punchy heaviness and I like it.

Hamilton Guyana Rum, 43%

From the rivers of Demerara…my favorite rum region….

This rum is aged up to five years. and bottled from the same bulk of rum that makes up the Hamilton 151 Demerara which will be the next one of his for me to try. But let`s start with this lower proof demerara and see what it gives.

The nose is quite light with fruity, slightly woody and buttery notes, there´s hints of banana peel and dark sugar.

It has a smooth taste and a velvety buttery mouth feel, charred oak and mash of overripe tropical fruits, some smoke and charred wood, so typical for the demerara rums made with the last remaining original stills of their kind still operating in the world.

Here´s a great rum for mixing up those great tiki cocktails! what i`d do is use this as a base, maybe with another rum and then use the 151 for a float 🙂 and of course it´s also a good sipping rum.

Tribute to The Mai-Kai’s Oh So Deadly (Recipe by the excellent Atomic Grog,)

Tribute to The Mai-Kai’s Oh So Deadly

0.5 oz fresh-squeezed lime juice
0.25 oz orange juice
0.25 oz pineapple juice
3/8 oz (3 teaspoons) rich cinnamon syrup
0.5 oz rich honey mix (see below)
0.5 oz Hamilton Guyana rum
0.5 oz Hamilton Black Jamaican rum
1 oz light Virgin Islands rum
1 dash Angostura bitters

Blend at high speed with 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of crushed ice for 5 seconds. Pour into a specialty glass. Add more crushed ice to fill.

I recommend using an intense cinnamon syrup, such as the B.G. Reynolds. For the honey-mix use a ratio of 2:1 honey to water. Heat up slightly and dissolve the honey in the water, then cool in the fridge until use.

Hamilton Coconaut

Hamilton Coconut

8 oz Lopez or Real Coconut Cream

2 oz fresh lime juice

4 oz Hamilton St Lucia Pot Still rum

3 oz Hamilton Guyana rum

Put everything in a blender and fill to the top with ice cubes and blend until slushy. Pour into ceramic coconut mugs or other tiki mugs.

Serves 2-4

Thanks to Jeanne “Catahula” Vidrine for letting me use her tiki collection while away from home 🙂

My conclusion: Is very simple – I love these rums! I like that they are so full of flavors. All three are very different, especially the Saint Lucian which I find to be something else….

They are full of flavors, complexity and punch! – all three of them.

Well done Ed Hamilton!!

Kōloa – A Handcrafted Rums from Hawaii

koloa dark label

Hailing from the “garden island” Kaua`i in Hawaii – Kōloa rum is a unique single batch handcrafted rum that is made from Hawaiian sugarcane and pure mountain waters of Kaua`i. It`s not made from molasses but from crystalized sugar with a high level of molasses in it setting it apart from other rums.

The making of rum has a long history on this island dating back to 1835 when the first harvest of sugar was made producing produced two tons of raw sugar from the Kōloa Plantation in Kōloa Town.

Today, Kaua`i’s  sugarcane still thrives in the rich volcanic soil typical for Hawaii, nurtured by the pure waters of Mt. Wai`ale`ale, the wettest spot on Earth.

Visitors to the island can taste the rums at the plantation-style Tasting Room & Company Store, located on the grounds of the Historic Kilohana Plantation.

The first batch of rum was distilled and bottled in September 2009. All of the rums are distilled twice in a 1210 gallon copper pot still.

The company have made rum since 2009 and have already won no less than 11 awards – most of them at the Rum Renaissance Festival in Miami and then at the  San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

Tasting the rums

What i got here to try out is their coconut, spiced, dark, white and gold rums! these are quite intriguing rums so where to start?

The bottles labels shows the plantation-style Tasting Room & Company Store and at the top of the necks of the bottles is drawn the map of the Hawaiian islands.

The bottles have plastic screw corks and even though real cork the old fashioned way is more “rummy” and romantic the screw corks are more practical – here´s to personal preference….

I think the one i was the most curious about was the coconut rum – because i have yet to find a good coconut flavored rum…most flavored rums honestly tastes like crap..

They either taste artificial or they taste too much and are cloyingly oversweet and i often find it to be the same with many spiced rums – and i got a spiced rum here too so this gonna be interesting…

This tasting have been done after tasting the rums several times which doesn´t show in this post and the rums have been tasted neat, with ice, water and in cocktails.

koloa dark and coconut

Kaua`i Coconut (80 proof)

On the nose it has light and sweet hints of coconut and it´s not too much either and i like that.

Taking a sip reveals a surprisingly smooth and natural tasting coconut rum which doesn´t have any of the cloyingly sweet and artificial flavors i have come across many times before.

The flavor also have a light crispness to it and it´s mild and sweet but not too sweet.

What i can feel on the palate is coconut and hints of vanilla and sugarcane. This is just fresh! and i`d say it´s a very good coconut rum, very enjoyable!

Kaua`i Dark  (80 proof)

It has a rich nose with hints of coffee and burnt sugar which makes me wanna have a sip…

The flavor to me is that of wood, vanilla, molasses and burnt sugar. Funny how i can feel coffee in the nose but not in the flavor…

Even more interesting is how i can find wood in the flavor when this rum have not been aged at all. Must be the blend of “spices” and caramel used to produce the dark color? and what spices they are i have no idea. It`s heavy on the vanilla too and something charred or toasted – maybe this is what i feel tastes like wood…

To me it´s a mixing rather than sipping rum unless you like vanilla a lot! And this rum is dark in every sense of the word – great for tiki drinks in my opinion.. I tried this rum in a coconaut and i think it was great.

I have a feeling that this rum is gonna grow on me when i continue to try it in various tropical rum and tiki drinks but also wanna try it with sugarcane coke. You`ll see it more on this blog.

koloa spiced, white and gold

Kaua`i White  (80 proof)

The white rum is distilled fresh and not aged and it´s a very pure rum with a clear color.

On the nose is a light whiff of vegetal notes and sweet sugarcane.

On the palate it´s rather dry, just a slight sugarcane sweetness, some vanilla, maybe a hint of citrus. Should be good in a daiquiri and i`m gonna make one because the daiquiri is to me is a sort of test drink for rums – a bad rum cannot possibly make a good daiquiri!

And as i suspected – it made a great daiquiri…

My conclusion of the white rum is that it´s good for both sipping and mixing and should be good in many other cocktails.

Kaua`i Gold  (80 proof)

This is a pale golden rum and the color comes from caramelized sugar and just like the white rum it has not been aged.

The nose is light with sweet sugarcane and a hint of vanilla paired with a little bit of fresh vegetal notes.

The flavor is light and sweet with hints of molasses. It`s a light rum and goes well in a daiquiri just like the white. It`s surprisingly mild and best to use in simple drinks, and i found that it pairs very well with pineapple juice.

Kaua`i Spice  (80 proof)

And so finally we get to the spiced rum. As for with flavored rums i`m always a bit suspicious when it comes to spiced rums. But i still try to approach every (to me) new rum with an open mind.

It sure does have a spicy nose…to me it´s hints of cinnamon bark, vanilla bean and maybe clove? there´s a lot going on here and i cannot detect all the flavors.

Then my mouth is filled with spice….it´s like an explosion of spice actually.

It´s sweet but not too sweet,  it´s spicy but well balanced – and there´s some hints of  roots and nuts? I wonder what`s in it? there´s also something astringent, i guess that´s what brings me to roots.

I used this as float in the Spicy Coconaut and it added quite some spice to the drink so the next time i should use a little bit less. Spiced rums can easily be overpowering and a little usually goes a long way.

This spiced rum is good and it definitely is a balanced blend of spices and what i`m guessing – roots and nuts. It also has long finish.

They have made a great spiced rum but i wouldn´t use it as sipping rum, only to mix with, trying to sip it would simply be too much.

To wrap it up:

What amazes me is that the The Kōloa Rum Company is so young – they have been producing rum for only a short while and already producing solid rums that has won 11 medals!

Overall i think the Kōloa rums are good, especially for mixing even though they do sip well – especially with some ice added – except for the spiced.

First i couldn`t point out what it was that made these rums taste differently from other rums but then i read that they use crystalized sugar produced at the nearby Gay and Robinson Sugar Factory with a high level of molasses in it – and that explained it!

And then of course the terroir* is always an important factor to any rums flavor.

*Terroir – the complete natural environment in which a particular spirit or wine is produced, including factors such as the soil, topography, and climate.

So now on to the drinks! No less than 3 of the drinks contains coconut flavor so here´s for the coconut lovers! but there´s a tasty rum sour there too…

Coconut Kula

Coconut Kula

0.5 oz fresh lime

0.5 oz grapefruit juice (yellow)

0.5 oz fresh orange juice

0.5 oz honey mix (equal parts water and liquid honey gently heated up to mix and then cooled to room temp)

0.25 oz demerara syrup

2 oz Kōloa coconut rum

Crushed ice

Shake together and strain into a tall zombie glass filled with crushed ice and garnish with pineapple leaf and tropical flower.

Kōloa Rum Sour

koloa rum sour

1 oz Kōloa Kaua`i white rum

1 oz Kōloa Kaua`i gold rum

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

1 egg white

0.5 oz pineapple gomme syrup ( or you can also use simple syrup)

Garnish the foam with Peychaud`s or Creole bitters forming the shape of a “Hawaiian wave”

Shake this hard and long to emulsify the eggwhite and create a good foam, then strain into a chilled cocktail coupe and add as much of the foam as possible to make it thick.

Garnish with the bitters. Create a “Hawaiian wave” by first carefully drop the bitters in the middle and then form the wave with a straw.

Spiced Coconaut

Spicy Coconaut

2 oz Lopez or Coco Real Cream of Coconut

2 oz fresh lime juice

2 oz Kaua`i Dark rum

Float Kōloa Kaua`i Spice ( about 0.25 oz)

Shake it hard to get the Cream of Coconut well mixed in and strain into a coconut mug with ice cubes.

Garnish with a tropical flower and pineapple leaaves.

Kōloa Pina Colada

pinacolada instagram

2 oz Kōloa Kaua`i white (or coconut rum – or use 1 oz each of white and gold or dark for a more flavorful colada)

2 oz cream of coconut (Coco Lopez or Coco Real)

2 oz pineapple juice (preferably fresh)

1 cup crushed ice

Blend or shake and pour into a suitable glass and garnish with pineapple and cherry or tropical flower.

Enjoy! Okole Maluna!

You can read more about  Kōloa rum on their website.

MIXING THROUGH GROG LOG 13 – Coconaut

Time to revisit the Coconaut which is a very nice Tiki drink. I wrote about it long ago and now its the 13th drink from Grog Log i stumble over. It contains only three ingredients – rum, lime and cream of coconut  (not coconut cream which is a different thing)

I like the coconut in all forms and yet i only use it occasionally, and i have tried without any success to figure out why since i really like it. Maybe some day i`ll find out.

So its rum, lime and coconut – a classic combination and such a simple drink really and very easy to play with – so let the fun begin!

COCONAUT

coconaut2

8 oz Lopez Cream of Coconut

2 oz fresh lime juice

7 oz dark Jamaican rum (I broke down the recipe and used 1 oz Smith & Cross and 1 oz Pusser´s overproof)

Put everything into a blender and fill up with ice cubes and blend until slushy. This serves 2-4.

In Grog Log there´s also a flaming version called Coconaut Re-Entry using a flaming lime shell. You remove the pulp from the half lime shell and partly fill with overproof rum and ignite it. I´m gonna do that but with my own twist of this drink. I`m not gonna leave this drink now just when the fun has begun!

FLAMING DEMERARA COCONAUT

flaming-demerara-coconaut

2 oz Cream of Coconut

0.5 oz fresh lime

1 oz Demerara rum

1 oz Lemon Hart 151

1/4 oz Kahlua Coffee Cream or other coffee liqueur

Proceed as with the Coconaut and set alight with some overproof rum in a lime shell.

Tasty, tasty, tasty! the Kahlua coffee cream added yummyness that goes very well with demerara rum.

Finally, the 2nd twist, let´s add some smoke now and see how that will taste. With smoke i mean mezcal and  i`m gonna use my favorite, the crema – made for women and a few strong men! (that´s what it says on the label) such a true thing!

And i love crema de mezcal, it´s so smooth, lightly smokey, creamy and mixes wonderfully.

SMOKY COCONAUT

smoky-coconaut

A silly name i know.-) but that´s so appropriate in the Tiki world..

2 oz Cream of Coconut

1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum

1 oz Del Maguey Crema de Mezcal

0.5 oz fresh lime

1/4 Kahlua Coffee cream (again, but yes – i insist)

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup (Petit Canne)

Oh wow! if the other two were tasty but actually quite similar, this was a entirely different beast. The mezcal added depth, smoke, complexity and well…a bit of mysticism actually even if it sounds ridiculous.

I guess mezcal has that kinda thing to it and crema de mezcal is so smooth and mixing that with a thing like Kahlua coffee cream and good rum, well you sure are in for a tasty treat.

The downside is that Kahlua coffee cream is probably not available anymore unless they have made it a regular, since it was a limited edition that was launched around x-mas 2009. I used it since i need to make more use of the bottle i have. But any good coffee liqueur could be used here.

Well, rum, coconut, lime, coffee, mezcal – this was really yummy and how can you possibly go wrong with these ingredients?

Coconut and Coconaut

The Coconaut is a very tasty Tikidrink which i like a lot. This evening i was going to let some friends taste this drink and i wanted a nice garnish. So what would fit better than some toasted shaved coconut?

Usually the only coconuts that can be found here are those brown ones…but that is ok as the brown edge is nice on the coconut shavings when used for garnish. To crack open one of those brown coconuts is easier than most people think. All you need is a coconut, a bowl and a large cleaver.

Hold the coconut over a bowl in one hand such that the middle of the nut rests in the middle of your palm, with the tip on one end and the eyes on the other. Now, whack the coconut with the back (that is to say the blunt side) of the cleaver a few times all around the center until it cracks open cleanly into two nearly equal halves. Make sure you use the blunt side of the cleaver. Catch the juice in the bowl as it drains from the cracks.

After the nut was cracked, (it took 1 minute), i shaved the flesh with a potato peeler making sure to get a little bit of the brown shell. The shaved coconut pieces can be toasted to a golden brown so they become crispy and have more flavor. Let toasted nuts cool completely before using. They can be stored, covered, in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks.

OVEN: Spread the coconut pieces evenly in shallow pan. Bake in preheated 350 degree F oven 5 – 7 minutes or until golden brown. Stir frequently and don´t leave unchecked.

MICROWAVE: Spread nuts evenly on microwave-safe plate. Microwave on high 1 minute; stir.
Microwave on HIGH, checking every 30 seconds, until nuts are fragrant and browned.

Now the coconut was sorted out, so on to the drink, the Coconaut!

The recipe in Grog Log calls for Lopez coconut cream and of course that`s one of those things i cannot find here so i used the only thing available, Opies “cream of coconut”. Its very sweet so i used a bit less. This is blended with dark Jamaican rum, i used Appleton VX. I could have used the Extra or Reserve but i have more of the VX left.. And then the fresh lime juice, i LOVE fresh lime Juice!

And in the blender with crushed ice until slushy…

COCONAUT from Beachbum Berry`s Grog Log, serves 2-4.

8 oz Lopez Coconut Cream
2 oz Fresh Lime Juice
7 oz Dark Jamaican Rum

The toasted coconut pieces proved to be a excellent garnish as it was not only nice to look at but also very very yummy to snack on right out of the drink.

COCONUT CHIPS WITH SEA SALT

The leftover coconut chips will last about 2 weeks in the fridge and can be used as a snack, or bar snack (well..if you drink or serve something else than coconut drinks…) or if you want to make just the snack:

1 coconut, butter, sea salt

Preheat oven to 350F and prepare a baking sheet by rubbing with butter. Open the coconut and shave into thin slices and bake them as described above. Then sprinkle with sea salt and serve in an empty coconut shell.

As this is a coconutty post i finish with a coconutty drink…i was lucky to find a fresh green coconut and sometimes the simple things are the best..

To easily open a fresh green coconut all you need is a cleaver and a chefs knife. You first cut off a piece from the bottom to make the nut stand steady and then you “shave” the upper part of the nut to form a top which you cut off. Then pour some rum in the nut and chill it in the freezer for a while before adding a straw and maybe squeezing some fresh lime on top.