MIXING TROUGH GROG LOG 15 – Colonel Beach`s Plantation Punch

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Here we have one of those genuine steady tropical tiki punches, made to relax with in a rattan chair while the sun sets and the cikadas start their nightly concert.

Made by Donn Beach and most likely as is stated already in the Log, a drink made for his steak and coffee house “The Colonel´s Plantation Beef Steak and Coffee House” in Waikiki Hawaii cirka 1950s. Sounds to me that those were the days..can someone please invent a real time-machine?

Thank God these recipes are still here (many due to some peoples hard work) so we can enjoy these drinks in our time.

All the ingredients in this drink are classic tiki cocktail ingredients including the pernod, one of the secrets at the time. This is a very rewarding drink to sip on. i think the ginger beer adds a very nice freshness while the three rums adds depth and complexity.

What you can do, if you wanna add some real funk to this drink is to make your own ginger beer, i bet it would make a fantastic flavor to this. I don´t have the time now to do that but i think i wanna try. That will have to be another blog post.

COLONEL BEACH´S PLANTATION PUNCH

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1 oz fresh lime juice

2 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

0.5 oz falernum

2 oz ginger beer

2 dashes angostura bitters

1/8 tsp pernod

2 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 oz gold Puerto Rican rum

0.5 oz Barbados rum

Shake with one cup crushed ice- Pour into tall glass with 3-4 ice cubes. Garnish with pineapple chunk and sprig of mint.

Well, i used a tiki mug instead..one that i find suitable for a plantation punch and which i found on the shelves in one of New Orleans liqueur stores.

The taste of the drink is both fresh, rummy and relaxed, just the way this kinda drink should be. I have nothing to complain on here.

And as usual, here´s a little twist of this drink and we move from the rattan chair to the beach, here`s a Beach Punch:

COLONEL BEACH PUNCH

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0.75 oz fresh lime

1.5 oz pineapple juice

1.5 oz root beer

2-3 dash Creole bitters or Peychaud`s

0.5 oz demerara simple syrup

1 oz dark Jamaican rum (Smith & Cross)

1 oz aged rhum agricole

0.5 oz LH 151

Shake with crushed ice and pour everything into a glass or tiki mug.

A typical tiki punch with extra flavors from the root beer. Nothing that sticks out but its relaxing and tasty. If you take the mint garnish and down it in the drink and stir a bit you`ll start to think about a julep sans bourbon.

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A peek in the glass..are you thirsty now?

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CREOLE BITTERS

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With spring comes new bitters…

Released in Europe while awaiting approval for the US – the Bitter Truth has come up with a stunning product – the Creole Bitters – and they make a spicy intense Sazerac..

The Creole bitters are based on a sampling of a pre-prohibition version of Peychaud’s – which makes them similar to Peychaud`s yet different in that there´s a stronger herbal component here, more earthy/spicy and the nose is strong.The Creole bitters has slightly less of the anise even though anise is the dominating flavor –  with more complexity, spice and bitterness.

I think this its great that we now have these bitters as Peychaud`s is extremely difficult to find outside of the US and some classic cocktails really needs those bitters so with the Creole bitters it will now be possible for many to mix these cocktails and of course here we have a great potential to mix up a range of other exciting cocktails.

What an interesting nose and flavor these bitters have – i can`t exactly put my finger on what all these flavors are…more than “spicy” and hm…familiar yet different. And so of course immediately i wanted to make a Sazerac and then comes an intersting question up as these bitters are spicier than Peychaud`s – a little dash of Angostura or not?

The Sazerac do not originally have that in the recipe but a little dash of Angostura makes a nice Saz..and it`s used quite often together with the Peychaud`s.  But with these spicier bitters now i don´t think we need that.

Another thing that sometimes is used in the Sazerac cocktail is a little vanilla extract and that i can imagine could go quite well with the Creole bitters as well. I´ll try that but not just now – this time its a regular Saz…with only the Creole bitters because after all – i wanted to find out how they were in this cocktail.

SAZERAC

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1/2 teaspoon Herbsaint or Absinthe
1 teaspoon of simple syrup or 1 cube of sugar or 1 tsp of granulated sugar
4 dashes Bitter Truth Creole bitters
2 ounces rye whiskey
Strip of lemon peel

Fill a 3-1/2 ounce Old Fashioned (rocks) glass with ice. Place the sugarcube in another glass and moisten it with water until it saturates and crush it or use simple syrup. Mix with whiskey and bitters, add ice and stir to chill.

Discard the ice from the first glass and add herbsaint or absinthe and coat the sides of the glass, then discard the excess (i like to leave a drop or two in the glass) Strain the whiskey into the glass and twist a lemon peel over the glass to express the oils, then rim the glass with it as well. Discard the peel, or if you like use it as garnish – but don`t drop the entire peel back in the glass, it would give too much citrus flavor.

This made for an interesting – more intense and spicier Sazerac. Its actually amazing…

The Creole bitters are not only a lifesaver for those who cannot so easily find Peychaud`s, its also a great addition to the cocktail world and there´ll be many exciting cocktails coming i`m sure. I like Peychaud`s and will not abandon them but i`ll use these just as much and for my part i believe my cocktail experience will be greatly enriched by the Creole bitters. My mind of course also goes to tiki cocktails.

As soon as these bitters are available in the US – folks – go and try them out, you won´t regret it. As for Europe they`re in the shop!