Old Beachcomber Favorite – The Penang Afrididi

Penang Afrididi 2

Here´s an old favorite again, the Penang Afrididi #1. It`s a “forgotten” tiki drink from 1937 and it was created by Don the Beachcomber. I like Donn`s drinks and I like this one! it was served at Don the Beachcomber’s Caberet Restaurant in the International Marketplace in Honolulu, circa 1958.

I`m curious about the name of this drink and wonder how it came to be and where it comes from…? if anyone knows please write in the comments.

There´s vibrant old dusty magic tasty tiki history here!

There´s also more versions of this drink, for example the #2 which simply cuts the same ingredients by half, blend and strain into a cocktail coupe or glass. Also Jason Alexander at Tacoma Cabana made his version of this drink and called it Penang Afrididi #3.

Penang Afrididi #3

2 dashes of Horror in Clay Tropical bitters, 1/2 oz each lime, orange, pineapple juices and 1/2 oz passionfruit syrup, 1/4 oz each falernum and fassionola, 1 oz ginger beer, 1 1/2 oz light rum, 1 1/2 oz Deep Ones Gold Blend (a house blend of three rums he makes), flash blend all ingredients.

Here´s the fassionola again, I need to try to make my own someday and I need to get the commercial version as well (the red one) I`d love to compare them, something I`ve had in mind for a while but that gonna be another post, and I also wanna try Jason`s version.

There´s also an interesting descendent of this drink that was dates back to the Mai Kai opening in 1956 and they had two versions of it, that drink is called the Zula and it`s flavor profile has only three ingredients, Herbsaint (or Pernod), pineapple, gold rum. You can read about the Zula over at the Atomic Grog.

Penang Afrididi 

From “Sippin’ Safari” page 95 by Jeff “Beachbum” Berry

  • 1 1/2 oz. Light Puerto Rican Rum
  • 1 1/2 oz. Amber Virgin Islands Rum
  • 1/4 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
  • 1/2 oz. Unsweetened Pineapple Juice
  • 1/2 oz. Orange Juice
  • 1/2 oz. Passion Fruit Syrup
  • 1/8 tsp. Pernod or Herbsaint

Put everything into a blender and add six ounces of crushed ice. Blend it at high speed for five seconds.

And I couldn`t resist to add some of the liquid from my jar of Maraschino cherries..and that´s what gave the drink that wonderful shades of red.

This is one of the typical old Don the Beachcomber drinks where he used his fantastic imagination to create types of drinks that at the time had never been seen before with multiple rums, juices, spices and “secrets” (like drops of Pernod)

His Rum Rhapsodies as he called them!

Next time I want to try the Atomic Grog`s Tribute to The Mai-Kai’s Zula…and i`d love to make a twist on it as well.

But until then i`ll make this – a twist on the Penang Afrididi using an aged rhum agricole sweetened with a mix of 50/50 passionfruit syrup and hibiscus grenadine.

Afrididi Martiniquaise (or Penang Afrididi #4)

Afrididi Martiniquaise

2 oz. Rhum agricole vieux (I used St James 12)
1.5 oz. Fresh Lime Juice
1/2 oz. Unsweetened Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz. Orange Juice
0.25 oz. Passion Fruit Syrup (homemade)
0.25 oz Hibiscus Grenadine (homemade)
1/8 tsp. Pernod or Herbsaint

Put everything into a blender and add six ounces of crushed ice. Blend it at high speed for five seconds. Pour into a snifter and add more crushed ice to fill. Garnish with a palm leaf and sugarcane stick.

It turned out to be a fruity and distincly rhum agricole forward drink….not strong, just fresh! the day I have my own fassionola made i`m gonna try that in this drink!

Orchid small

Bring on the spring and summer with a Strawberry Hurricane!

To me there`s nothing that tells me more that the spring and summer is on the way than fresh strawberries. Granted there´s some time left until the summer is here and the strawberries i see in the shops are imported but just seeing them is at least a promise

The other day i saw a picture of a strawberry Hurricane over at a blog i really like – Suck The Heads – and when i saw that picture i immediately wanted to have one.

And that´s why i`m making it now, i decided to mix up my own version. To most people the Hurricane cocktail is the same as the red ones you get at Pat O’Brien’s but that´s not the whole truth. The original Hurricane is quite a different beast…

It contains fresh fruit juices and not that mixer in a bag – you can read all about here and here – that said, the “tourist-version” sure serves it´s purpose still and Pat O’Brien’s is a cool place but the real one is what i`m going for and in this post i wanna change it up a bit by adding one large muddled strawberry to the party plus some of one of my favorite rums, Old New Orleans Cajun Spiced.

The Hurricane is wonderful cocktail in the spring and summer and it´s huge! which in a way can be a “dilemma” because if you don´t want it to become too diluted and watery too fast you need to not drink to slow but at the same time if you drink fast you get drunk too quick…

To prevent quick dilution it´s a good idea to use fresh and very cold ice, shake it quick and enjoy!

STRAWBERRY HURRICANE


1 oz light rum (use a good quality rum)

1 oz dark rum (use a good quality rum )

0.5 oz Old New Orleans Cajun Spiced Rum

1 oz fresh orange juice

1 oz fresh lime juice

1/4 cup passion fruit juice, or 1 tablespoon passion fruit syrup – homemade or B.G Reynold´s.

0.5 oz simple syrup

1 teaspoon grenadine – i use homemade or B.G Reynold`s hibiscus grenadine which i find superior to any other grenadine

1 really large ripe strawberry or 2-3 small ones

1 small tsp golden fine sugar

Muddle the strawberry with sugar in a shaker, add the rest of ingredients and shake with ice and double strain into a hurricane glass half filled with crushed ice. Add more crushed ice to fill and garnish with speared strawberry slices and pineapple leaf tops.

Now…enjoy!

MAI TAI TWISTS – let´s have some fun!

Moving on to the topic of Mai Tai twists from the last post about how to do the original Mai Tai right…

So it´s time to play! the goal here is to stay somewhat true to the Trader Vic´s recipe with only some slight changes because i don´t wanna loose too much of the Mai Tai formula..but true Mai Tais it ain´t anymore…

The garnish is changed all the way out though, not a mint to be seen…,not that i don´t like mint and i`m a purist when it comes to the original Mai Tai but it´s refreshing to play with something else. I was going to try to find hibiscus buds but alas no hibiscus anywhere…I did find a red bromeliad flower though and some green dracaena leaves.

I really enjoy walking around in the fruit and plant/flower markets looking for interesting stuff for garnish and to go in the drinks!

Mai Tai twists – i`m all for it and what is tasty or not is so personal. Some find for example the Bitter Mai Tai gross and even an abomination – i find it tasty but then again i`m a Campari geek. In fact i like it so much i even made a twist of it..

BITTER CHOCOLATE MAI TAI


1½ oz Campari

¾ oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum

1 oz lime juice (save the spent lime shell to go in the shaker)

¾ oz orgeat

½ oz orange Curaçao

3 dashes Mozart Chocolate bitters

Shake and strain into a double old fashioned or other glass and sink the spent lime shell into the drink. Garnish with a sprig of fresh mint, or something tropical.

What is done here? well, one of the rums is switched for Campari and chocolate bitters are added. Not a Mai Tai anymore… and that´s why it has “Bitter Chocolate” in the name.

A lot of what i write here is obvious for many of us, so all of you who already know these things please bear with me…there are many out there who wanna learn.

The addition of Campari for one of the rums is not my invention, the Bitter Mai Tai was created by Jeremy Oertel at Dram in Brooklyn, NYC. I only added the chocolate bitters to the party. There´s also a bitter Mai Tai variation with Cynar instead of Campari. I bet it is good..

I like it bitter – but i also like it sweet and so i`m moving on to a sweet variation in a while.

Way too many bars serves twists on the original recipe that changes the drink very much but they still call those drinks just Mai Tai – like the original Mai Tai and that`s just WRONG.

So here´s the sweet one, using homemade hibiscus grenadine instead of orange curacao and rhum agricole blanc.

HIBISCUS QUEEN


1 oz rhum agricole blanc

1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum

1 oz lime juice (save the spent lime shell to go in the shaker)

¾ oz orgeat

0.5 oz hibiscus grenadine

A couple dashes hibiscus tincture (steep dried hibiscus flowers in highproof vodka for 1-2 weeks) on top of the ice. Or by all means, use peychauds.

Shake it up and strain into a tall glass or a hurricane glass (double the recipe) with crushed ice and top the ice with hibiscus tincture (or peychauds) garnish with a red hibiscus flower bud and stick a straw through it.

So by just adding hibiscus grenadine and switching the aged agricole for a blanc it turns out a different drink. Often you only need small changes to transform the drink into something entirely different.

But other times there´s bigger changes…here is another quite interesting variation called Stormy Mai Tai that uses lots of angostura bitters that i found over at Cocktail Quest.

Another interesting post on the subject Mai Tai as foundation you can read over at Chemistry of the Cocktail.

Now on to another very interesting twist, this one was created by my friend Tony Harion from Mixing Bar in Brazil. He uses Brazil nut orgeat and cachaca. Since i can´t get the cachaca he used since it´s not available outside of Brazil i used another VERY good cachaca – Abelha Gold.

UAI TAI – (pronounce it “woai tai”)

1 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 oz oak aged cachaça

0,5 oz Cointreau

0,5 – 0,75  oz lime muddled

0,5 – 0,75  oz Orgeat do Pará or Brazil Nut Orgeat

 

Tony`s instructions:

Muddle lime in the base of a shaker, add other ingredients and proceed like you would in a regular Mai Tai. Garnish with a mint sprig and a lot of love.

For the Orgeat do Pará, use Rick’s (Kaiserpenguin) Orgeat recipe but sub the almonds for Brazil nuts. The orange flower water can be left out.

Switching out the almonds and adding the cachaça brings a whole new character to the drink. The aromatic oils on the Brazil Nuts float to the top and transport you straight to the mountains of Minas Gerais in one snif.

Uai (pronounced jus like “why”) is a very popular slang in Minas and could mean pretty much anything. After three of these I’m sure you’ll understand what it means.

 

I really like the Ua Tai…it has an exotic flavor..and earthiness from the cachaca.

So what do you think about the original Mai Tai and in doing variations? where is the thin line? when does it become a bastardization?

 

Sugarcane bar

 

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MIRACLE MILE BITTERS

During Tales there´s always some bitters going around and i now have  five new bitters to play with and first out are 2 bitters from Miracle Miles – Chili-Chocolate and Yuzu.

Miracle Miles bitters are locally made artisanal bitters that started just over a year and a half ago. Louis Anderman – the maker of these bitters became friends with Joe Keeper from Barkeeper (an awesome barware shop n LA) and would always bring him some of his homemade experiments, bitters, Nocino, etc.

In December ’09 he did the Chocolate/Chili bitters, and Joe flipped over them and begged  for some. Louis tweaked the recipe a bit for the next batch and gave some to Joe, then after refilling his bottle for the second time in about 3 weeks he said, “Hey, why don’t you start selling these here?”

Then more and more bars started picking them up, and all of a sudden Louis was getting so much other momentum (e.g., interest from distributors) that he realized he was reaching a point where he had to go pro, or go home.

The varieties Louis currently makes are: Chocolate/Chili Bitters,
Gingerbread Bitters, Castilian Bitters, Sour Cherry Bitters, Yuzu Bitters, Forbidden Bitters and finally Orange Bitters.

That`s a bunch! and i don`t think they are out for purchase yet so i`m very happy i have got 2 of them.

CHILI-CHOCOLATE BITTERS

The chili-chocolate is made with fine Vahlrona chocolates and a mix of chilis.

In the nose you feel an exquisite and fine chocolate smell and when you taste it it´s there together with ginger, allspice and nutmeg, sweetened with molasses and maple syrup – with a slight chili bite.

The chocolate-chili bitters are perfect for dark rum drinks as well as bourbon, rye, tequila and well – any dark spirits really – anything that goes with well chocolate.

People also use them on ice-cream and coffee..mmm – i´m gonna try them with my blend of Community Coffee Nola blend with chickory and Pecan-Praline…oh my..

I stumbled upon a drink when i was sitting and reading an article about whiskey cocktails in Hawaii. Since ii like both cocktails, whiskey and Hawaii they had my attention.

The drink i was reading about – The Whiskey Thatcher – really looked interesting to me and looked like something where the chili-chocolate bitters would add a nice spicy touch. (btw the Whiskey Thatcher is a variation of a gin drink named after former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher- but don´t mix things up now…i`m not promoting Thatcher…and this blog is totally politics-free – i`m promoting booze!)

The Whiskey Thatcher was created by Dave Newman, bar manager of Nobu, Honolulu, Hawaii who was wondering if the Thatcher would work with whiskey which apparently it did.

Today people want spirits with more character – and i see whiskey coming back and also other flavorful, handcrafted spirits like rum, tequila and mezcal. Even vodka producers are going in that direction creating small batch vodkas with flavor – one example is Karlsson´s which contains 12 different potatoes.

The Whiskey Thatcher blends citrus and sweet, herbal and bitter with the depth and roundness of the whiskey. And besides, anything that contains campari is worth trying i think.

So here we go – the Whiskey Thatcher with dashes of chili-chocolate bitters!

WHISKEY THATCHER


0.5 oz Campari

2-3 mint leaves

A strip of lemon peel

1 tsp fine sugar. (i used Oxfam`s raw sugar)

1. 75 oz Bourbon

Hibiscus syrup ( a splash)

Bourbon ( a splash)

Top with dashes of Miracle Mile Chili-Chocolate bitters

Muddle a slice of lemon peel, two or three mint leaves, 1/2 ounce Campari and 1 teaspoon of fine sugar in a mixing glass.

Add 1. 75 oz bourbon, and a splash of hibiscus syrup and fresh juice from half a lime.

Shake with ice.

Put a splash of pernod and a splash of bourbon (the recipe calls for Wild Turkey but i had Maker`s Mark on hand) in the bottom of another (slightly preheated) lowball glass, light it on fire and burn off the whiskey and pernod. And fresh ice; and strain the drink from the first glass into the prepared glass and stir.

Top off with dashes of the chili-chocolate bitters. (I added a generous amount of dashes..)

Garnish with a fresh mint sprig and if you feel like it a lemon peel as well. (The garnish is not in the original recipe)

Yeah…I like it…it´s spicy…

From that i moved on to mix me this next drink because Louis told me to try it –  2oz demerara rum, 1/2 oz pineapple gomme, 2-3 dashes chocolate/chili bitters, built like an old fashioned – and indeed it was good – very aromatic and deep.

YUZU BITTERS

Now after these two very satisfying cocktails with dark rums it was time to try out the Yuzu bitters.

Released only a few months ago, it’s quickly catching up to the Chocolate/Chili in popularity in LA, and KL Wines in SF sold out of a full case within five days. In addition to the yuzu, cinchona is used for the bitter plus cardamom, cinnamon, and burdock root among the other spices, and two kinds of green tea to round out the finish.

The flavor of the yuzu bitters is something in between a lemon and a tangerine, with a deep citrus flavor. Yuzu is a citrus fruit rom SE Asia and which is a cross between sour mandarine and Ichang papeda – Citrus ichangensis × C. reticulata

Here`s a link to pictures of Yuzu.

These bitters would go well with anything that goes with citrus and i`m sure also with herbal liqueurs and so therefore i decided to try a variant of the Chartreuse swizzle adding Yuzu bitters thus turning it into a Yuzu Swizzle.

YUZU SWIZZLE


1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
0.75 oz Lime Juice
1/4 oz Falernum (i used B.G Reynold`s Dark Falernum)
3 dahses of Miracle Mile Yuzu bitters

Add ingredients to a large glass full of crushed ice. Swizzle to mix, lavishly garnish with mint, squeeze a bit and add a few extra dashes of the bitters on top of the ice as well.

After trying this i can say that it is tasty – no doubt – but i wonder if the yuzu and the green chartreuse might play out each other a bit…i cannot detect the flavors of the yuzu so clearly. Nevertheless – tasty it is. But i needed something “cleaner” to give the yuzu bitters space to play and the flavors to shine a bit more..

So how`bout a Yuzu daiquiri?

Hell yeah! and this is what i used:

2 Havana Club 3 yo

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup

3 dashes yuzu bitters

Float Coruba overproof

Now this was better in the sense of putting the yuzu flavors more forward and a Daiquiri is always a very nice cocktail – one of my favorite cocktails.

This has been fun and i`m very pleased with the Miracle Miles bitters, go try them when you get a chance.

And finally – try Yuzu bitters on oysters…

TWO COCKTAILS FOR NEW YEAR

Already 2011 very soon..time flies i must say. I`m happy for that cuz that means that the next summer is approaching..and since i`m no winter person the faster the better!

Here`s two cocktails – both with rum…what else? The first with Campari, lime and my newly made batch of hibiscus grenadine. The second with rhum agricole, Smith & Cross (or Pusser`s) and grilled pineapple-honey syrup.

I think rum and Campari goes very well together so look out for an upcoming post on that topic. This cocktail is simple but tasty:

CRIMSON KISS

crimson-kisss-2

1.5 oz white Rum

1 oz Campari

0.5 oz Hibiscus grenadine

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.25 oz simple syrup

1 egg white

Shake ingredients vigorously so that the egg white mixes well into it, a good idea is to dry shake first without ice and then add ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a lime slice or a lime leaf.

How to male Hibiscus syrup you can read about here or order it from Trader Tiki.

The next is a tiki drink.

Here`s a mix of aged rhum agricole, Smith & Cross (or Pusser`s is good too) grilled pineapple-honey syrup, fresh lime and topped with some champagne. Its light and fresh with that grassy agricole flavor clearly coming throuh which is what this cocktail is supposed to do.

HALA KAHIKI

hala-kahiki

1 oz aged rhum agricole (i used Clèment VSOP)

1 oz Smith & Cross (or Pusser`s )

0.5 oz grilled pineapple-honey syrup

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

Top with a little champage of a drier type (brut)

Float overproof Coruba

Shake everything except the champagne…then strain and pour into a glass and top with the champage, and last give a little float of overproof Coruba.

I guess a float of JWray would be good too! Garnish with a pineapple slice.

GRILLED PINEAPPLE-HONEY SYRUP

Grill a pineapple round until you get grill marks and cool, then cut in 4 parts . Then make a simple syrup with golden raw sugar and water 2:1 and add the pineapple pieces and let boil for a while to get the flavors in. The add a little liquid honey and mix well, and take off the stove and cool to room temp. Let the flavors settle for a while.

I was tempted to use coffee liqueur in this drink but since i wanted the agricole flavors to come through clean i didn`t. But i`m tempted to play with this cocktail and try the coffee sometimes and also Mozart Dry chocolate spirit and green Chartreuse.

Have a fantastic New Year!

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2010!

2010-new-year-tiki-drinks

Happy 2010 folks!

Here are three New Year tiki drinks to imbibe at the end of this year (and thereafter) Thanks for reading my blog and commenting on my posts which helps keeping the blog alive.

I`m happy to now be on the right side of the year soon – now we move towards spring and summer again even though very slowly..so here its not going to get any darker but slowly lighter, but i won`t see any change until beginning of march. For the moment it gets dark around 3pm.

I hope to mix many many drinks in the year to come..

DRUNKEN MOAI

A handful fresh pineapple chunks
Dash cinnamon powder
1t liquid honey
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
2 oz aged cachaca
A little champagne to top
Garnish hibiscus sugar rim, pineapple leaves and slice.

Crush dried hibiscus flowers into a fine powder and mix with a golden fine sugar. Rim a tall glass and fill up halfway with crushed ice – carefully to not ruin the rim, Muddle pineapple, cinnamon, honey and lime in a shaker, add cachaca and ice and shake well.

Double strain into the glass, fill up with some more crushed ice and top with a little bit of champagne.

NEHE NEHE

2 oz rhum agricole blanc
0.5 oz golden raw sugar syrup
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
1 oz fresh grapefruit juice
Dash Angostura bitters
Small dash hibiscus grenadine
Garnish golden sugar rim and citrus leaves

Rim the glass with golden fine sugar and fill up halfway with crushed ice – carefully to not ruin the rim,.Shake ingredients and strain into the glass and add more crushed ice to fill  Garnish with a few citrus leaves.

THE RISING SUN

2 oz El Dorado 3 year old cask aged rum
¼ oz Mozart Dry
1 oz pineapple juice
A little champagne to top
Garnish cocoa rim and mint

Rim the glass with cocoa powder, fill up with crushed ice. Shake ingredients except the champagne and strain into the glass. Carefully add more crushed ice to fill and top with a little champagne.

Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Happy New Year and Okole Maluna!

Sugarcane bar

 

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MAKING JAMAICA HIBISCUS DRINK

jamaica

I once got the question what to do about the very sour tartness of the blood red hibiscus ”tisane” called jamaica (hamaica) which is made with water and dried hibiscus flowers and indeeed is very tart. When you drink it unsweetened your tongue crumble.

The question was how much really to sweeten it as there were other sweeteners going to be used in the drinks at the bar.

When i got the question i was thinking of my own experinces with hibiscus flowers which is in the making of my hibiscus grenadine which i do quite often. I know that in the grenadine the flowers adds a very fresh and tasty tropical touch. The grenadine is sweetened with simple syrup and its pretty sweet.

I decided to make a small batch to find out which ratios of sugar or syrup was needed to get it tasty instead of tart with a dry-mouth-feel aftertaste. The key is to sweeten the hibiscus drink enough much – but at the same time keep it sweet-tart balanced as its going to be used in drinks which may also be sweetened with other things. Its good to taste while you are boiling it until you find the right sweetness, or you sweeten it afterwards.

And even though you`ll use something to sweeten your drinks you can still sweeten Jamaica quite a bit because it really is tart.

I added 1 oz  agave syrup, stirred, then tasted, then added another 1 oz more etc and found it was good after 3 oz. It wasn`t too sweet, but still a bit tart but now in a pleasant way.

Here is the way i made it:

2 cups (5dl)  water to 2 handful of dried hibiscus flowers
3 oz ( 90 ml) agave syrup
Boil for 5 minutes
Cool for 2 hrs

That`s it! i got a flavor that is sweet enough to temper the tartness but with some sourness still in it, enough to add that deliscious zing and still compose a good balance. This hibiscus drink is very useful, its fresh, tangy and light, wonderful as a cocktail mixer and can of course be drunk without alcohol as a summer refreshener.

I imagine Jamaica goes well with most spirits and that it would pair well with all manner of citrus fruits, cinnamon, ginger, clove, cardamom, vanilla, almond, pear, guava, banana, pineapple, mango, passionfruit, mint, basil, cilantro, red beet juice, cherry, apple, pomegranate juice and surely much more.

Next time i`m going to grate some fresh ginger into it maybe paired with some fresh lemongrass, honey and vanilla – spices that adds some warmness to the sourness, sweetened with syrup, raw sugar or/and honey.

So now when we have the Jamaica we need a cocktail right? as the Jamaica is both tart, fruity and have a fresh tropical flavor i think its fitting with something light and refreshing and then i added some Campari. Its not summer i know – but  i want to pretend it is.

AMORE

amore-2

1.5 oz Gin

1.5 oz Jamaica
1.5 Campari
Top with Lemon soda
Stir with ice and garnish with a fragrant mint sprig.

I have found out also that the hibiscus flowers can be dried again after use and be re-used one more time. Just place them in a strainer and let them get much air, they take a little time to dry completely, then place them in a jar until its time to re-use them.

Then you use a bit less water than the first time and boil them a little bit longer to extract all the remaining flavour and color.