FIBAR 2015 and the European Tiki Experience

A Fibar Valladollid a sign

FIBAR is the biggest bar Show in Spain and was held in Valladolid in a pretty cool building that looks like a giant football, the Cúpula del Milenio on november 17-19.

The first ever European Tiki Experience took place there on the tuesday nov 17th and it was for that I was invited to do a seminar about the history of tiki together with Oriol Elias from the Rum and Tiki blog Three of Strong. We made a seminar called “Paradise Lost, the Roots of Tiki” where we covered the history and roots of the American Polynesian Pop culture with all it´s past and present bars and bartenders, carvers, artists, writers, musics and what the tiki culture is all about.

We also raised a toast with Chief Lapu Lapus to Jeff Beachbum Berry in appreciation of all that he did to uncover the lost recipes and all the books he wrote containing history and recipes for a lifetime! because without him we wouldn`t have all these recipes resurrected today.

And he toasted us back….in a video he made back in New Orleans 🙂

Paradise Lost seminar Bum video

The other speakers in the Tiki Experience were Sly Augustin, owner of the Tiki bar Trailer Happiness in London who made a seminar called “The Future of Tiki”, and Miguel and David Perez also know as the two “Brothers in Tiki” were talking about tiki bar and tiki products.

Thanos Prunarus, owner of the famous Baba au Rum bar in Athens did a seminar about the Anatomy of Tiki Drinks and Miguel Escobedo, (Kona Lei) did a seminar called “Tiki-Orama:50 years of Cocktails and Iberian Tiki”

Among the guest bartenders were Guillermo Uriel, bartender at Mahiki in London.

Pavon tiki mugs was also for sale and I was happy to be able to grab a few….they have some that are really cool like the big bamboo and the pineapple mugs, they also have a swimming vahine bowl that is pretty cool and another with a smiling tiki that looks very happy and drunk 🙂

One thing that I learnt at the Tiki Experience is that Tiki in Europe is most likely going to become bigger and bigger but be formed in it´s on fashion and inventiveness – but without losing connection with the traditions. I see a very exciting future for both rums and tiki in Europe…

A very interesting seminar that I attended was Luca Picchis seminar about the Negroni cocktail where he also presented his book “Negroni Cocktail an Italian Legend” which I also bought a copy of and I would recommend anyone who`s a lover of cocktails to get a copy, it´s a masterpiece.

Negroni cocktail book

Every night after FIBAR there was a party and good food to have…the bar to go to was El Nino Perdido, great cocktails and nice atmosphere! Bar manager at El Nino Perdido is Juan Valls, also the organizer of FIBAR Valladolid.

There were a lot more things happening at FIBAR but we had only one day of the three so the other things that happened at FIBAR I cannot write about…..but i`m very happy to been able to be there, it was a great experience and I met so many nice people both new and old friends and I hope I can be back again the next year!

Here is as usual when I go to these kind of events, a picture parade….because pictures speak more…

Cúpula del Milenio

Cúpula del Milenio

Cocktail at Fibar 1

Beautiful Daquiris like these…

Cocktail at Fibar 3

Paired with Spanish croquetas…

Yuzu 2

Yuzu…

Gin and Tonic 2

Siderit Hibiscus Gin, made in northern Spain and very tasty.

Gin and Tonic sign 2

….made a very refreshing gin and tonic.

Hendrick´s Gin skeleton

Hendrick`s Gin booth, give him a drink….

12194748_721951264602260_1156685002207731606_o

Luca Picchi (Head bartender in Coffee Rivoire of Florence and author of the book Negroni Cocktail) made a great seminar about the Negroni – The history of the Negroni cocktail and the Italian appetizer ! 

(pic credit FIBAR)

Negroni at pianobar

Piano….and Negroni….

Fair rum

FAIR Rum from Belize!

Rum Don Q

And Puerto Rican Don Q

Cocktails at Fibar

Mezcal goodness and burnt cinnamon stick – yummy…

Plantation rums Stiggin´s fancy2

Plantation rums! and of course the famous Stiggin´s Fancy….probably the tastiest pineapple rum I have ever tasted.

Pavon big pineapple mug

Big pineapple tiki mug from Pavon.

Pavon vahine mug

And a swimming vahine.

Paradise Lost seminar Aloha shirt and rum

Aloha shirt and rums….

Paradise Lost seminar Oriol

Oriol at our seminar “Paradise Lost, the Roots of Tiki”

Paradise Lost

And now we`re entering the realm of tiki…

Paradise Lost presenters

Three of Strong and A Mountain of Crushed Ice taking it through the history of tiki to show where it came from and that tiki is so much more than just the drinks, which btw were some of the world´s first crafted farm to glass cocktails – in tropical costume.

Paradise Lost diap 8

And no tiki seminar without the Bums books!

Paradise Lost diap 7

Or the Bum himself….

Paradise Lost seminar Chief Lapu Lapu 4

Chief Lapu Lapu was served….

Paradise Lost seminar Chief Lapu Lapu in glass 2 (2)

And it was good….

Sly Augustin

Sly Augustin (Trailer Happiness, London) talked about the exciting future of tiki.

(pic credit FIBAR)

Miguel and Thanos

While Miguel Escobedo (Kona Lei, Madrid)  made a seminar called – Tiki-Orama:50 years of cocktails and Iberian Tiki, and Thanos Prunarus (Baba au Rum) spoke about the anatomy of The Anatomy of Tiki Drinks and of course his world famous rum bar, Baba au Rum (pic credit FIBAR)

Guille Uriel

Guest bartending was Guillermo Uriel, bartender at Mahiki in London. (pic credit FIBAR)

Tiki Brothers

The Tiki Experience was created by Miguel Pérez Muñoz and David Perez, also known as the “Brothers in Tiki”  (pic credit FIBAR) who also did a seminar about tiki bar and tiki products.

Thanos seminar 1

Three Dots and a dash, one of my fav tiki cocktails

There were so much more than what these pictures have shown and we were there only one of three days! try to go and visit the FIBAR in 2016!

Beachbum Berry Tiki Barware to be Introduced by Cocktail Kingdom and Jeff Beachbum Berry!

Pearl Diver 3

Premium Bar Tools & Glassware to Complement the Current Tiki Cocktail & Bar Renaissance!

Named “one of the instigators of the cocktail revolution” by Esquire’s David Wondrich, and one of Imbibe Magazine’s “25 Most Influential Cocktail Personalities of the Past Century,” Jeff “Beachbum” Berry is the author of six books on vintage Tiki drinks and cuisine, including the recently published Potions of the Caribbean: 500 Years of Tropical Drinks and the People Behind Them (Cocktail Kingdom, October 2014; $27.95).

Pearl Divers collage

As a natural progression from this position of authority, Beachbum Berry has teamed up with Cocktail Kingdom, the premier barware producer and cocktail book publisher, to create the Beachbum Berry line of glassware and tools designed specifically for the Tiki enthusiast, which will be available starting late Monday, May 18, at www.CocktailKingdom.com.

Drawing on Tiki’s long history, Beachbum Berry and Cocktail Kingdom combined their talents to recreate items that were once essential items at the best Tiki bars and restaurants across the U.S.

Pearl Diver Glass

Beachbum Berry Tiki Line glasses

Named for the Pearl Diver cocktail, this uniquely shaped glass held many exotic drinks in its heyday of the mid-20th century – including the Planter’s Punch at Don the Beachcomber’s in Hollywood, the Sumatra Sam at Doc’s Place in Toronto, and the Deep Sea Diver at Mai-Kai in Ft. Lauderdale. By the 1970s, however, the distinctive but delicate glass had all but disappeared making them very rare, highly prized collector’s items.

Excellent for any tall drink, the Beachbum Berry Pearl Diver Glass from Cocktail Kingdom is an exact replica of the original exotic design.

Pack of 4 ($36.95), case of 24 ($179.00)

Swizzle Cup

Swizzle Cup

The long-lost Swizzle Cup came to fame in the 1940s at the hands of Don the Beachcomber, the father of the Tiki bar and the Tiki drink, who served up wildly popular faux-Polynesian concoctions, most of which had Caribbean roots. Among them were Swizzles, based on a West Indian technique of churning drinks with a spoked twig that had been whittled into a “swizzle stick.”

By the 1950s, the sleek metal Swizzle Cups frothed with exotic cocktails, but were expensive to make (and replace when customers absconded with them); by the 1980s they had disappeared from Tiki bars and been replaced with standard Collins glasses.

Cocktail Kingdom’s Swizzle Cup is an updated version of the original bespoke vessel – sleeker and made of lighter-weight stainless steel, perfect for any julep, cobbler, swizzle or other long drink.

($14.95)

Skull Bar Spoon

skull bar spoon

Tiki drinks didn’t just cater to 1950s suburban fantasies of a work-free island paradise; there was also the call of adventure, epitomized by such classic Tiki cocktails as “Skull & Bones,” “Shrunken Skull” and “Cannibal Grog,” drawn from pirate history and headhunter lore. To help you mix such South Seas concoctions, Cocktail Kingdom and Beachbum Berry created the Skull Bar Spoon for that touch of deserted island vibe.

The new Beachbum Berry Tiki items join Cocktail Kingdom’s other Tiki tools, including the Navy Grog Cone ($17.95), which was first created by Don the Beachcomber for the purpose of forming his signature ice-cone garnish in faux-Polynesian punches.

Tiki’s history and extensive array of cocktails can be explored further in Beachbum Berry’s book, Potions of the Caribbean, which is available at www.CocktailKingdom along with the new Tiki tools and glassware, all of which can be shipped nationally and internationally; shipping rates apply.

Stainless Steel ($22.95), Copper-Plated ($27.95), Gold-Plated ($29.95)

Cocktail Kingdom

 

Cocktail Kingdom is the world’s premier manufacturer and distributor of professional bar supplies, offering a wide spectrum of barware created to meet the exacting standards of professional bartenders. Products are designed to incorporate historical cues and contemporary knowledge to be practical and elegant, yet durable enough for daily use.

Cocktail Kingdom has dedicated itself to design and functionality, with the understanding that utility and practicality are the prime factors in professional barware. Find Cocktail Kingdom on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CocktailKingdom, or on Twitter via @CocktailKingdom

That`s such amazing and good news!! I for one have been wanting that Pearl Divers glass and Swizzle cup or years! I`m glad they are re-creating them! and that nifty skull bar spoon is a must as well 🙂

Thank you Jeff Berry and Cocktail Kingdom now we can sip our Pearl Diver`s Punches and other drinks and Rum Swizzles in style! now go get it! I know I will….

 

Images courtesy of Jeff Berry and Cocktail Kingdom

Potions of the Caribbean!

BB Book Cover Potions of the Caribbean

Bring out your bar tools people! the long awaited new book from Jeff  “Beachbum” Berry is here! And the book cover is as sunny as the Caribbean sun!

“POTIONS OF THE CARIBBEAN:

500 YEARS OF TROPICAL DRINKS AND THE PEOPLE BEHIND THEM,”

BY JEFF BERRY

BB Book Planters Punch

For the Conquistadors, the Caribbean was “New Spain.” For Victorian England, Jamaica was “The New Riviera.” Chicago mobsters transformed Havana into “The Las Vegas Of The Caribbean,” while Tiki-crazed tourists remade Puerto Rico into “Hawaii In The Atlantic.”  Since Columbus first stumbled on the Caribbean, invading hordes have continually tried to turn it into something else — and with every reinvention of the region came a reinvention of its drinks.

Potions of the Caribbean strains five centuries of this fascinating history through a cocktail shaker, serving up 77 vintage Caribbean drink recipes — 16 of them “lost” recipes that have never before been published anywhere in any form, and another 19 that have never been published in book form.

Even more delicious are the stories of the people who created, or served, or simply drank these drinks.  People like William Dampier, the 17th-century “pirate of exquisite mind” who plundered native cities but collected native recipes … José “Sloppy Joe” Abeal, who became an overnight celebrity when Prohibition brought millions of thirsty Americans to his sleepy Havana saloon …

Conrad Hilton, the bible-thumping tycoon who used drinking and gambling to kickstart modern Caribbean tourism … mysterious Egyptian mixologist Joe Scialom, who escaped a Cairo prison to bring a new style of cocktail to the islands … restaurateur “Trader Vic” Bergeron, whose faux-Polynesian Tiki drinks turned the West Indies into a surrogate South Pacific … and hard-drinking novelists Ernest Hemingway and Graham Greene, who hated each other almost as much as they loved frozen Daiquiris.

BB Book Puka Puka Punch

 

BB Book Planters punch rum bottle

And the Bum and his outstanding work is loved…

As “a hybrid of street-smart gumshoe, anthropologist and mixologist” (The Los Angeles Times) and “the Indiana Jones of Tiki drinks” (The New York Times), Jeff “Beachbum” Berry is uniquely qualified to tell this epic story-with-recipes, lavishly illustrated with vintage graphics and rare historical photos.

Praise for Beachbum Berry’s five previous books about tropical drinks (The Grog Log, Intoxica!, Taboo Table, Sippin’ Safari and Beachbum Berry Remixed):

“ Mr. Berry’s lasting contribution may be in salvaging tropical drinks from decades of bad bartending.” — Steven Kurutz, The New York Times

“Without Berry many cocktail recipes and bartender secrets might be lost to history, but his relentless research has paid off in spades, so we still can take a glimpse into the past and sip the drinks of our forefathers … I raise my coconut to Beachbum Berry.”
– Gary Regan, author of The Bartender’s Bible and The Joy of Mixology

“Jeff uncovers lost artefacts and recipes like no other … his books are an exact extension of his own personality, as all good books should be.” — Ian Cameron, Class magazine

“I wish I had either the depth of understanding (or the taste buds) of Jeff Berry when it comes to these tropical punches. As it is, I just follow him around and happily drink what he tells me to.” — Ted Haigh, author of Vintage Spirits And Forgotten Cocktails

And i wanna add: Without Jeff Berry and his books i wouldn`t know what i know today about exotic cocktails and the tiki era. He is a great inspiration to us all and every time i`m looking for inspiration for a drink to create or just looking for a good tiki drink to mix up i pick up either one of his books or the iphone app. (which comes out so handy when not at home)

The work he have done with digging out all these lost and forgotten recipes is priceless.

This new book “Potions of the Caribbean” is the result of five years work!

I for one i cannot wait to read it! you can now pre-order your copy at the Cocktail Kingdom and the books will be shipped out on dec 10th.

BB Book La Florida Daiquiri no 3

 

BB Book Beachcomber

 

BB Book Collage

The Black Magic Cocktail and How to sub a Defunct Rum

Black Magic 1

Oh how i wish sometimes that i could just for a day or two transport myself back to the time where the tiki drinks were served with rums like the 17 year old JWray, the quintessential Mai Tai rum or for example the Jamaican Dagger rums…

Well, there IS still some of those rums left…maybe a bottle or three? and these are kept by a few rum collectors..but i actually once did have a smaller bottle of one of the dagger rums. And yep i won`t forget that rum. Or the other vintage rums i`ve luckily been able to taste in various places.

Many of these rums had a flavor profile that of old jamaican pot still plus so much more…and it seems to me that more and more rum companies are trying to re-create that flavor profile again – a good example is Smith and Cross. But these – even though they are very good to my taste – haven`t been able to duplicate the flavor those vintage rums had. We the rum drinkers who are or have not been in a position to collect some of those elusive vintage rums must make do with substitutions.

I`m going to make an example here with a vintage tiki drink called the Black Magic. Dark rums and coffee is what gave this drink it´s name and it was made by Mariano Licudine while he was still working for Don the Beachcomber in the Don the Beachcomber restaurant in Chicago. He later moved on to Fort Lauderdale to work at the Mai Kai.

I have read that he had 48 drinks on his cocktail menu that called for 43 different kinds of rum…so he knew his rums and how to blend different rums to create new flavor profiles for his cocktails – much like Don the Beachcomber.

So when he went to work at the Mai Kai he brought with him many of the recipes of Don Beach drinks and made his own twist on them.

What made the Black Magic so distinctive was not just the blend of dark rums and coffee which is delicious – but it was also the rums used and in this drink one of the Jamaican dagger rums played an important part.

dagger-punch-jamaican-dark-rum

Dagger was a Jamaican dark rum brand which is now defunct. The one i tried had a dark mahogany color and dark tones of burnt molasses and dried fruits, and it was spicy and woody, balanced and complex with a vintage feel.

There are different dagger rums with different agings and here´s what the Bum wrote about one of Mariano´s old dagger rums he tried at the Mai Kai´s back bar, stucked away on a shelf as it was.

“It puts the current dark Jamaican offerings on the market to shame; nothing in the Appleton or Myers’s portfolio even comes close.”

So what to do? how do we sub rums like that?

Reading more on the Atomic Grog`s website thought me that the same company that made the dagger rums now makes a rum that is hard to find – but not impossible – the Kohala Bay.

Now i have no way of finding Kohala Bay so then what to do? i kept reading and found out that they suggested an equal mix of Smith and Cross and El Dorado 12 year old demerara rum.

And finally – i can do that. What i can say is that these rums made a nice drink, tasty and strong but if it comes anywhere close to how the original Black Magic tasted when made with the jamaican dagger rum – it surely ain`t.

And close to how it tastes with the Kohala Bay rum? i cannot tell…all i can say that it´s a tasty drink and that the Smith and Cross/El Dorado 12 yo combo is a good one.

Try it for yourselves..this recipe is the Tribute to the Dark Magic as found on the Atomic Grog.

On the Mai Kai menu it said –

BLACK MAGIC

The owner’s choice. A superbly smooth but forthright blending of fine dark rums and tropical juices, subtly laced with coffee and truly refreshing.

Read the rest of the review here.

Black Magic 3

Tribute to The Mai-Kai’s Black Magic

* 3/4 ounce fresh-squeezed orange juice
* 3/4 ounce fresh-squeezed lime juice
* 3/4 ounce white grapefruit juice
* 3/4 ounce rich honey mix
(2:1 honey to water, mixed and cooled)
* 1 1/2 ounces strong Kona coffee,
freshly brewed, then chilled
* 1 1/2 ounces Coruba dark Jamaican rum
* 1 1/2 ounces Kohala Bay dark Jamaican rum
(substitution suggestion below)
* 1/2 ounce Don’s Mix
(2 parts grapefruit juice to 1 part cinnamon syrup)
* 1/2 teaspoon allspice dram (aka pimento liquor)
* 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Blend with up to 1 1/2 cups of crushed ice in a top-down mixer for around 5 seconds, or until frothy. Pour into a large snifter glass with more crushed ice to fill. Garnish with a lemon peel.

Something about the coffee…try to get real Hawaiian Kona coffee if you can but if you can`t try to get either Louisiana Community coffee dark roast or Jamaican Blue Mountain. I don`t think any other coffee will do. You need a full flavored and strong coffee like these.

Instead of a snifter i decided to let this drink christen my new awesome tiki mug created by Scott Taylor who lives on Maui, Hawaii. if you want to see the awesome and very detailed mugs he makes you can go and check out his pictures on instagram ( type the name tikipop )

Black Magic 4

His shop “Beach Bumz” is one of the stops of Maui Tiki Tours owned by another great tiki mug artist – Rob Hawes – who`s Kala mug i featured in this earlier post. You find his pics on instagram too, (type tikirob)

If you go to Maui make sure to stop by the shop, you will find tiki mugs by Scott, Rob and some other local artists, tiki farm, etc.

Also Gecko on Oahu will be releasing Scott´s new Ka’oha design mug in a much more affordable run than the others that have sold..most likely in July on his Southseaarts.com website.

The pics below (by Scott Taylor) are some of Scott´s tiki mugs:

Scott Taylor mugs 4 Coconut Beachcomber & Tapa Tri-Foota

Scott Taylor mugs 5 Marquesan Pineapple bowl

Scott Taylor mugs 2

Lapu Lapu Drinks

Lapu Lapus are some strong rum drinks and it is said that they bring magic and makes you “see things on the other side” – whatever that means…

The term Lapu Lapu drinks comes from a legend that for some obscure reason happened to be the name sake of the drink Chief Lapu Lapu. The name is after the Filipino chief Lapu Lapu – who defeated Magellan in 1521 (you can read about the legend in Remixed)

And how that name so many years later was used to name rum drinks served in the polynesian restaurants during the great tiki era is one more of those mysterious things that belongs to the rum soaked tiki drink world..

There´s also a Disney version of a Lapu Lapu served at the Polynesian resort in a hollowed out pineapple (like the Boo Loo) containing rums, orange juice and sour mix.

The Lapu Lapu drinks mentioned in Jeff Beachbum Berry`s Remixed are the Chief Lapu Lapu, Aku Aku  Lapu and the lesser known Kikuya Lapu ( all are on page 61-63 in Remixed)

These three are all different incarnations of the same drink and it´s a drink large enough to serve two people but of course they can be enjoyed by one, it´s just a lot of rum!

I can´t say which one of these i like the most, they are all tasty and the Aku AKu Lapu packs a serious punch.

Chief Lapu Lapu 

3 oz orange juice

2 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice

1 oz  sugar syrup
(1 part sugar, 1 part water, boiled and chilled)

1 oz passion fruit syrup

1 1/2 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 1/2 oz light Puerto Rican (or Virgin Islands) rum

Shake well with ice cubes in a large shaker and pour into a large snifter. Add more ice to fill.

Aku Aku Lapu

1 oz lemon juice

1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

1 oz grapefruit juice

1 oz  orange juice

1 oz Falernum

1 oz  gold rum

1 oz  dark Jamaican rum

1 oz  Lemon Hart 151 Demerara rum (or 1 1/2 oz regular proof Lemon Hart)

16 oz crushed ice

Blend at high speed for about 20 seconds. Pour into large snifter or bowl and add more ice to fill. Traditional garnish is a gardenia.

This one is from the Aku Aku restaurant in Las Vegas cirka 1960. In Intoxica it says the Aku Aku once fronted the Stardust hotel along with two massive moais or Easter Island (Rapa Nui) statues. The phrase Te pito o te henua has been said to be the original name of the island.

Aku Aku was the book title of Thor Heyedahl´s bestseller – an author i have enjoyed over the years. His theory on how those giant moais were moved gave name to the word aku aku:

Aku Aku – To move a tall, flat bottomed object (such as a bookshelf) by swiveling it alternatively on its corners in a “walking” fashion. [After the book by Thor Heyerdahl theorising the statues of Easter Island were moved in this fashion.] source: LangMaker.com. Aku Aku also has another meaning to the islanders: a spiritual guide.

Kikuya Lapu

0.5 oz cranberry juice

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.75 oz orange juice

0.75 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

0.75 0z grapefruit juice

0.75 oz passionfruit syrup

0.75 oz honey mix

1.5 oz dark jamaican rum

0.5 oz caribbean 151 rum

Dash angostura bitters

6 drops pernod

3 drops almond extract

Shake with plenty of ice and pour unstrained into a snifter or tiki  bowl, adding more ice to fill. Traditional garnish is pineapple; cherry, mint and a paper parasol.

This is the third lapu lapu drink in Remixed and the least known. It´s also the only one not originating from the old tiki era, it was created in 1992 by Bob Esmino for the Kikuya restaurant in Huntington Beach CA. He provided most of the “lost” Kon-TIki recipes in both Remixed and Sippin`Safari.

Royal Hawaiian Lapu Lapu

Half fill a brandy snifter with shaved ice, if you can`t get shaved, try get it a fine a possible.

2 oz white rum ( use a good quality rum that has flavor)

Add 60 % pineapple juice and 40 % orange juice – to almost fill up the glass but leave some room for the floater.

Add a tsp each of orgeat, sugacane syrup and passionfruit syrup.

A 2 oz floater of dark rum – and use a rum that is really dark if possible.

Shake and strain and fill up with more shaved ice and float the dark rum on top.

Garnish with a thick lime peel hanging over the rim. Well i made a different garnish because my limes were finished and used pineapple instead.

So this was all the Lapu Lapu drinks i could find, in the next post i`m going to make Aku Aku drinks…and when a drink is called Aku AKu Lapu i guess it` s both a Lapu and Aku drink? i just love the tiki drink world!

Okole Maluna!

The Boo Loo – Beware of it`s quiet strength

Here` s a quick post on one of the more well known tiki drinks the Boo Loo. A while ago i had a Boo Loo weekend together with a few people on instagram, yes really…there´s quite a bit of tikiphiles and other tropical drink lovers out there..and it´s fun when everybody post up their Boo Loo pictures.

The Boo Loo is usually served in a pineapple but i think it also looks fantastic in a goblet a la Forbidden island style – or other cool glass. I made a traditional one served in the pineapple and then another in a glass that night and only switched out some of the rums for variety and there´s quite a lot of rum in this drink…

Speaking of which – as in all rum forward drinks make sure to use good rums!

This is a Lapu Lapu type of drink, and it`s  enough in the pineapple or glass to be shared by two but can of course be good for one as well, heck i had two myself… It´s a polynesian restaurant style drink and similar to the Chief Lapu Lapu, Aku Lapu Lapu and the lesser known Kikuya Lapu ( all are on page 61-63 in BB Remixed)

These three are all different incarnations of the Chief Lapu Lapu which got it´s name after the Filipino chief Lapu Lapu who defeated Magellan in 1521 (you can read about the legend in Remixed) and how a rum drink served in tiki bars can get it´ name after that event is part of the mystery..

And so the Boo Loo is that kinda drink, boozy in a quiet way…and very relaxing.

Try it!

BOO LOO

  • A few small fresh pineapple chunks
  • 2 1/2 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 1 1/2 oz lime juice
  • 1 oz honey
  • 1 1/2 oz club soda
  • 1 1/2 oz Demerara Rum
  • 1 1/2 oz gold Purto Rican rum
  • 3/4 oz dark Jamaican rum
  • 3/4 oz 151 Demerara Rum

Put pineapple chunks, honey and lime and pineapple juices in blender and blend without ice until liquefied. Pour unstrained into a hollowed out pineapple filled with crushed ice (or goblet) Add rums and soda and stir until well chilled.

As for the honey – heat until liquid and lightly cool it before adding to the blender. I always use liquid honey to make it even easier to mix.

I know the drink was created around 1965 but by whom i have no idea but it`s on the menu at the Fobidden Island. The Boo Loo is in Beachbum Berry`s Grog Log and Remixed.

This drink is quite rum forward and don`t be tricked by the honey and pineapple smoothness – this drink will creep up on you. But i like boozy drinks especially if the booze is rum…

If you add some coffee and mole bitters you get a Princess Kalakau which is a twist i made and you can call it the Boo Loo`s spicier cousin.

MIXING THROUGH GROG LOG 21 – Eastern Sour

Here`s and old favorite…the Eastern Sour. Orange and lemon juices, sugarcane syrup, orgeat and then rye or bourbon.

It´s drink number 20 in Grog Log and is also featured in Remixed where i also found the Western Sour which contains grapefruit juice and falernum. I find yellow grapefruit juice much tastier in mixed drinks than the pink one, it´s simply fresher and has that sourness which balances so well with sweeteners yet still contains that sour freshness.

The Eastern Sour was made sometimes in the 50s by Trader Vic. He also made the London Sour (sub scotch for the bourbon) and Munich Sour ( cognac) These sours were made for the various Trader Vic`s restaurants.

The Western Sour was featured at Steve Crane`s Kon-Tiki restaurant chain operating in Sheraton hotels across the U.S. Steve Crane and Trader Vic did really compete and in the end Vic did outlast Steve and the Kon_Tiki`s.

So…bourbon or rye?

I like both..but shame on me! –  i`m out of bourbon…so it´s rye to go in both drinks, and i`m using Rittenhouse bonded.  Also i found a few fresh kalamansi limes so i`m gonna use them in both drinks to see what happens.

EASTERN SOUR

Juice of 1/2 orange

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1/4 oz orgeat syrup

1/4 oz rock candy syrup (well, i didn´t have that, so i used Petit Canne´s sugarcane syrup)

2 oz rye or bourbon

Now i added: juice of 1 kalamansi lime and garnished also with a sugared rim

Shake well with plenty of crushed ice. Pour unstrained into a double old fashioned glass or short stemmed goblet. Sink spent orange and lemon shells into the drink.

Since the kalamansi is both sweet and sour but a bit more on the sour side i decided to make a sugared rim on the glass to add some extra sweetness. I think it was very tasty with some tangy kalamansi juice in the Eastern Sour even though it doesn´t make itself very much noticed in this drink – just subtle. That said it was very very tasty.

WESTERN SOUR


1 oz white grapefruit juice

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz falernum

0.25 oz sugarcane syrup

2 oz Bourbon (or rye)

Shake well with ice cubes and por unstrained into a double old fashioned glass.

As i suspected, white grapefruit juice and kalamansi limes like each other and plays together very well..and here the two together is da bomb! this drink is so tasty!

The kalamansi transforms the drink from quite average to one step higher. Otherwise the Eastern Sour is in my opinion better than the Western but when kalamansi is in the game it`s slightly the contrary.

Interesting how the addition of just one thing can change things around!

I think i need to go and get me a kalamansi plant so i can have fresh kalamansi limes and make these  drinks all summer!