Help save Tujague`s

Say it ain´t so….

There`s a restaurant in New Orleans – which is not just “a” restaurant – Tujagues is the city’s second oldest restaurant (after Antoine’s) and may be in jeopardy of closing. Please, please, please don’t close Tujague’s….

Here`s the story and here.

I think it would be a catastrophe and very very sad  if this old New Orleans landmark would be replaced with yet another “I got drunk on Bourbon” type of tacky tourist t-shirt shop..

Ann Tuennerman, founder of the Tales of the Cocktail wrote this open letter to Stanford Latter:

Please see below my letter to Stanford Latter. This is such a potential tragedy that I have written the following letter and would like to ask for your help sharing it with your audience  and helping me appeal to Stanford Latter.

Dear Mr. Latter,

Let me start by saying how sorry I am about the recent loss of your brother, Steve. In the time I got to know him through my work with Tales of the Cocktail and the New Orleans Cocktail Tour two things always stood out– his dry wit and his love for New Orleans. He clearly had a deep respect for the history and culture of our great city with the way he ran Tujague’s for more than 30 years.

Now, I don’t claim to be a real estate expert so I can’t speak to getting the most out of your investment. But as the founder of New Orleans Culinary and Cocktail Preservation Society, I do know about our city’s rich history of dining and drinks. Tujaque’s is the place that continued the legacy of Madame Begue’s legendary brunches and where the Grasshopper cocktail was invented. It’s the home of brisket and horseradish and the beautiful long standup bar that takes you back in time when you order a drink. It breaks my heart to picture the doorway of this landmark littered with Drunk 1 and Drunk 2 t-shirts.

This city is in the midst of a renaissance– one that’s met with both excitement and fear. Every day brings progress that New Orleans hasn’t seen in decades. But the great fear, one that’s generations old, is that with progress comes a cleansing of the culture that makes this place not a just a great place to visit but, more importantly, a great place to live.

Culture doesn’t just disappear in a day. Here one day, gone tomorrow. It erodes slowly as people put the bottom line ahead of everything else. But it doesn’t have to be that way. With what you choose to do with the Tujague’s building, you can stand for the peaceful coexistence between progress and culture.

I know business is business. But sometimes selling to the highest bidder comes with costs that can’t be counted in dollars and cents. Like losing yet another of our beloved restaurants and a piece of the living history that makes New Orleans so special.

If you sell the Tujague’s building to the wrong person, the rest of us will be the ones paying for it. So please, Mr. Latter, respect our history, respect our culture and respect the legacy your brother worked his life to build.

Sincerely,

Ann Tuennerman, Founder of Tales of the Cocktail

Thank you in advance.

And here´s why Tujague’s is important! These are some historical facts about Tujaque’s:

New Orleans original stand-up bar.

Built in 1827 on site of old Spanish Armory.

Beginning around 1856, this locations was Madam Begue’s, famous for her 3-hour meals, later called “brunch” became Tujague’s sometime after WWI.

In the 1800’s, New Orleans started drinking early – bar opened at 5:00 am – did brisk before-work business.

During Prohibition, Tujaque’s waiters carried contraband bottles in their aprons.

During Prohibition, Federal Agent Isadore Einstein came to New Orleans to test how easily liquor was accessible. Einstein stepped off the train in New Orleans and got a drink in 37 seconds!

Famous for the Grasshopper which was invented by a bartender there who entered a competition!

GRASSHOPPER: Equal parts of crème de menthe, crème de cacao and light cream or milk. Shake with ice and strain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zthnyi-LwyQ

And here´s what cocktail historian David Wondrich has to say:

“Tujague’s is one of the most authentic, unspoiled examples of a nineteenth-century bar left in America. To lose it would be to not only lose an important link with the history of New Orleans (a city whose reputation as a place to visit was largely built on the character of its old bars and restaurants) but with America’s history as well. I know that with a little patience this historic place can be saved, and I pray that that patience is found.”

David Wondrich – Cocktail Historian

Also John Besh have expressed interest in buying Tujague´s restaurant:

If I could affect a better outcome coming to Tujague’s than a T-shirt shop, then I will have done something good for my city.” — John Besh

Tujague`s – 823 Decatur St  New Orleans, LA 70116, (504) 525-8676

You can help by sharing the open letter and support Tujague´s!

http://videos.nola.com/times-picayune/2013/03/dinner_at_tujagues_restauraunt.html

Lapu Lapu Drinks

Lapu Lapus are some strong rum drinks and it is said that they bring magic and makes you “see things on the other side” – whatever that means…

The term Lapu Lapu drinks comes from a legend that for some obscure reason happened to be the name sake of the drink Chief Lapu Lapu. The name is after the Filipino chief Lapu Lapu – who defeated Magellan in 1521 (you can read about the legend in Remixed)

And how that name so many years later was used to name rum drinks served in the polynesian restaurants during the great tiki era is one more of those mysterious things that belongs to the rum soaked tiki drink world..

There´s also a Disney version of a Lapu Lapu served at the Polynesian resort in a hollowed out pineapple (like the Boo Loo) containing rums, orange juice and sour mix.

The Lapu Lapu drinks mentioned in Jeff Beachbum Berry`s Remixed are the Chief Lapu Lapu, Aku Aku  Lapu and the lesser known Kikuya Lapu ( all are on page 61-63 in Remixed)

These three are all different incarnations of the same drink and it´s a drink large enough to serve two people but of course they can be enjoyed by one, it´s just a lot of rum!

I can´t say which one of these i like the most, they are all tasty and the Aku AKu Lapu packs a serious punch.

Chief Lapu Lapu 

3 oz orange juice

2 oz fresh-squeezed lemon juice

1 oz  sugar syrup
(1 part sugar, 1 part water, boiled and chilled)

1 oz passion fruit syrup

1 1/2 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 1/2 oz light Puerto Rican (or Virgin Islands) rum

Shake well with ice cubes in a large shaker and pour into a large snifter. Add more ice to fill.

Aku Aku Lapu

1 oz lemon juice

1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

1 oz grapefruit juice

1 oz  orange juice

1 oz Falernum

1 oz  gold rum

1 oz  dark Jamaican rum

1 oz  Lemon Hart 151 Demerara rum (or 1 1/2 oz regular proof Lemon Hart)

16 oz crushed ice

Blend at high speed for about 20 seconds. Pour into large snifter or bowl and add more ice to fill. Traditional garnish is a gardenia.

This one is from the Aku Aku restaurant in Las Vegas cirka 1960. In Intoxica it says the Aku Aku once fronted the Stardust hotel along with two massive moais or Easter Island (Rapa Nui) statues. The phrase Te pito o te henua has been said to be the original name of the island.

Aku Aku was the book title of Thor Heyedahl´s bestseller – an author i have enjoyed over the years. His theory on how those giant moais were moved gave name to the word aku aku:

Aku Aku – To move a tall, flat bottomed object (such as a bookshelf) by swiveling it alternatively on its corners in a “walking” fashion. [After the book by Thor Heyerdahl theorising the statues of Easter Island were moved in this fashion.] source: LangMaker.com. Aku Aku also has another meaning to the islanders: a spiritual guide.

Kikuya Lapu

0.5 oz cranberry juice

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.75 oz orange juice

0.75 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

0.75 0z grapefruit juice

0.75 oz passionfruit syrup

0.75 oz honey mix

1.5 oz dark jamaican rum

0.5 oz caribbean 151 rum

Dash angostura bitters

6 drops pernod

3 drops almond extract

Shake with plenty of ice and pour unstrained into a snifter or tiki  bowl, adding more ice to fill. Traditional garnish is pineapple; cherry, mint and a paper parasol.

This is the third lapu lapu drink in Remixed and the least known. It´s also the only one not originating from the old tiki era, it was created in 1992 by Bob Esmino for the Kikuya restaurant in Huntington Beach CA. He provided most of the “lost” Kon-TIki recipes in both Remixed and Sippin`Safari.

Royal Hawaiian Lapu Lapu

Half fill a brandy snifter with shaved ice, if you can`t get shaved, try get it a fine a possible.

2 oz white rum ( use a good quality rum that has flavor)

Add 60 % pineapple juice and 40 % orange juice – to almost fill up the glass but leave some room for the floater.

Add a tsp each of orgeat, sugacane syrup and passionfruit syrup.

A 2 oz floater of dark rum – and use a rum that is really dark if possible.

Shake and strain and fill up with more shaved ice and float the dark rum on top.

Garnish with a thick lime peel hanging over the rim. Well i made a different garnish because my limes were finished and used pineapple instead.

So this was all the Lapu Lapu drinks i could find, in the next post i`m going to make Aku Aku drinks…and when a drink is called Aku AKu Lapu i guess it` s both a Lapu and Aku drink? i just love the tiki drink world!

Okole Maluna!

Shamrock Daiquiri

Happy St Patrick´s Day!

Not all St Patty`s cocktails are Irish whiskey and you don`t need to be Irish to celebrate st Patrick´s Day! be Irish for a day and enjoy some good “green” cocktails or some Irish beer!

I have made a daiquiri with a good flavorful white rum, lime and sugar and a little green chartreuse for a herbal kick and a dash green curacao for color. The drink is actually not that dark green, it´just looks very dark in the picture. The drink has a grassy green color or shamrock green, hence the name.

Shamrock DaIquiri

2 oz white rum – i used Denizen rum

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 0z sugarcane syrup

0.25 oz green curacao

0.25 oz green chartreuse

Shake with ice and train into a chilled coupe with a green sugar rim and garnish with something appropriate for St Patrick´s Day.

This drink tastes like a classic daiquiri with a herbal and citrusy touch.

And what would St Patty`s Day be without a couple of Irish blessings?

May good luck be with you Wherever you go , And your blessing outnumber the shamrocks that grow.

May there always be work for your hands to do.
May your purse always hold a coin or two.
May the sun always shine on your windowpane.
May a rainbow be certain to follow each rain.
May the hand of a friend always be near you.
May God fill your heart with gladness to cheer you.

May neighbours respect you,
Trouble neglect you,
The angels protect you,
And heaven accept you.

The Boo Loo – Beware of it`s quiet strength

Here` s a quick post on one of the more well known tiki drinks the Boo Loo. A while ago i had a Boo Loo weekend together with a few people on instagram, yes really…there´s quite a bit of tikiphiles and other tropical drink lovers out there..and it´s fun when everybody post up their Boo Loo pictures.

The Boo Loo is usually served in a pineapple but i think it also looks fantastic in a goblet a la Forbidden island style – or other cool glass. I made a traditional one served in the pineapple and then another in a glass that night and only switched out some of the rums for variety and there´s quite a lot of rum in this drink…

Speaking of which – as in all rum forward drinks make sure to use good rums!

This is a Lapu Lapu type of drink, and it`s  enough in the pineapple or glass to be shared by two but can of course be good for one as well, heck i had two myself… It´s a polynesian restaurant style drink and similar to the Chief Lapu Lapu, Aku Lapu Lapu and the lesser known Kikuya Lapu ( all are on page 61-63 in BB Remixed)

These three are all different incarnations of the Chief Lapu Lapu which got it´s name after the Filipino chief Lapu Lapu who defeated Magellan in 1521 (you can read about the legend in Remixed) and how a rum drink served in tiki bars can get it´ name after that event is part of the mystery..

And so the Boo Loo is that kinda drink, boozy in a quiet way…and very relaxing.

Try it!

BOO LOO

  • A few small fresh pineapple chunks
  • 2 1/2 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 1 1/2 oz lime juice
  • 1 oz honey
  • 1 1/2 oz club soda
  • 1 1/2 oz Demerara Rum
  • 1 1/2 oz gold Purto Rican rum
  • 3/4 oz dark Jamaican rum
  • 3/4 oz 151 Demerara Rum

Put pineapple chunks, honey and lime and pineapple juices in blender and blend without ice until liquefied. Pour unstrained into a hollowed out pineapple filled with crushed ice (or goblet) Add rums and soda and stir until well chilled.

As for the honey – heat until liquid and lightly cool it before adding to the blender. I always use liquid honey to make it even easier to mix.

I know the drink was created around 1965 but by whom i have no idea but it`s on the menu at the Fobidden Island. The Boo Loo is in Beachbum Berry`s Grog Log and Remixed.

This drink is quite rum forward and don`t be tricked by the honey and pineapple smoothness – this drink will creep up on you. But i like boozy drinks especially if the booze is rum…

If you add some coffee and mole bitters you get a Princess Kalakau which is a twist i made and you can call it the Boo Loo`s spicier cousin.