Rhum Arrangè de Cèd – Point G – Rum Buried in Salt…

POINT G bottle

The Point G by Rhums de Cèd is a very special curiosity – it´s a rhum arrangè with Ananas Victoria (a special type of pineapple growing in la Rèunion island) that has been buried in a salt marsh for 2 months….

Yes you read that right, the bottles were buried in a salt marsh (marais salant) with seawater and clay in France for two entire months allowing the salt flavors to enter through the cork and thus give the rum inside a special flavor note. I especially like how there is still dried clay on the rum bottles!

I asked Cèd what the salt have done for the rum? he said the pineapple note is prolonged and salt helped approve its taste and smell with a little salty note. I have tried some of his other rhum arrangées and let me tell you he makes some quality stuff! (I earlier reviewed his Rhum Banane Cacao) he sure knows what he is doing.

“Point “G” is macerated with pineapple Victoria and was buried for 2 months in the salt marshes. It was covered with clay and then sea water. The result is quite surprising on the color and taste”

I also asked two rum cork makers and experts in London during the rumfest this past fall what their thoughts were about whether or not salt can actually enter through the cork into a bottle and affect the flavor of the rum and wooow did I get them to scratch their heads…I bet they never got such a question before… 🙂 Well, they had never heard of it before..but they did not deny it could happen.

In any case this rum does taste wonderful and I think it`s a VERY interesting experiment to say the least and btw who does this??

Gotta be a real rum geek right?

I just love it!

POINT G in the marsh

The nose of Point G is mature tropical pineapple paired with a musky earthy scent and in the mouth the pineapple flavor is of course dominant, paired with that earthy taste and then a tiny hint of something, could it be the salt? adding a bit of zing to the flavor.

The overall impression is a very tropical mellow flavor – soft, rich, full-flavored from ripeness and earth that is pleasantly agreeable.

The best way to enjoy a rhum arrangè in general is to drink it as it is with a little ice or without, but you can make cocktails with it too and since this rum is made with pineapple there´s a lot of drinks it can be used with. I would keep it simple though in order to not let these exquisite flavors get lost with too many other juices and stuff.

The Point G was an experiment and the limited amount of bottles are unfortunately long gone, but let`s hope he does this again in the future! but Cèd does indeed have some very good other rums, all excellent and made with real fresh, organic and seasonal fruit macerations – “rhum arrangè” – for sale on his web page and also in spirit shops in France.

One online (and physical in Paris shop) is Christian de Montaguère and another is La Gourmandine Rhumerie and they ship worldwide.

POINT G collage

He has rums such as Mangue-Passion, Ananas Victoria, Carambole-Passion, Banane-Cacao, Vanilla-Macadamia…(i`m drooling here 🙂 Another thing these rums can be used for is in desserts! i made baked papaya with vanilla, dark sugar and coconut milk “garnished” with the Banane-Cacao rhum…

So I keep it simple and serve this drink, and since the Point G is not available right now you may use his normal pineapple rhum arrangè which is made with the same ananas victoria and a hint of vanilla.

Mixed with fresh pomelo juice and lime plus a touch of dark sugarcane syrup and chilled with ice, the heavy earthiness is lifted up into a more fruity fresh character that would be very nice I imagine on a hot day on the beach.

Point G Rhum Punch

POINT G Rhum Punch

60 ml (2 oz) Point G or Rhum arrangè Ananas Victoria

30 ml ( 1 oz) Pomelo juice

15 ml (0.5 oz) fresh lime juice

15 ml (0.5 oz) dark sugarcane syrup (sucre de canne roux)

Don`t shake, just stir together like you would do a ti punch and add a chunky ice cube or two that doesn´t melt too fast.

Garnish with a slice of pomelo fruit.

This makes a very refreshing distinctively tropical drink to enjoy.

PONIT G in the marsh 2

Isn`t it beautiful? (picture crèdit Cèdric Brement)

MxMo LXXXVI, Pineapple!

Pineapple ready for cocktail mixing

The Hawaiians call me hala-kahiki, meaning hala from a foreign land….. who am i?

The PINEAPPLE !!

The mighty pineapple is the topic for this months Mixology Monday hosted by Thiago of the BartendingNotes blog. I haven`t participated in the MxMo in a very long time and so it´s long due…but who can resist such a topic? i love pineapples!

mxmologo

Here´s what was said in the MxMo announcement: Let’s bring the king of fruits back! After being canned, mixed with all sorts of sugary liquids and blended into… some 80s dreadful cocktails, the pineapple needs more respect! Once a symbol of hospitality, the King of Fruits might be know misunderstood.

One of the greatest non-citrus souring agents, used for crazy garnish ideas, infusions, old gum syrup flavoring, the pineapple is a fruit to be reckoned.

Be in a tiki cocktail, an old school classic like the Algonquin, a crazy flavor pairing or just mixed in a delicious Verdita, get creative and make a cocktail using any part of this delicious, juicy fruit or share you favorite pineapple cocktail with us!

The pineapple is called the “King of Fruits” for a reason – there is NO other fruit that has become so famous as the pineapple, not even banana! there is even pineapple houses built! And it´s so incredibly versatile, you can do so much with it, in drinks and food in a million ways….use as serving bowl, lamp, it´s sung about, painted, photographed…and no wonder, the fruit is beautiful! and a fabulous cocktail ingredient, and that`s where i use it the most and i use it extensively.

King of Fruits Swizzle

MxMo pineapple King of Fruits Swizzle 3

0.75 oz Koloa Kaua`i Coconut rum

0.75 oz Plantation overproof rum

0.5 oz Lost Spirits Navy Style rum (float)

1 oz Pineapple juice

0.5 oz honey-mix – equal parts honey and water, heated up to dissolve the honey and mix, then cooled to room temp

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

2 dash Bitter End Jamaican Jerk Bitters

Top with a little Sanpellegrino limonata

Swizzle all ingredients and top with Sanpellegrino limonata (sub Schweppes lemon)

Garnish with two pineapple leaves and a cocktail cherry.

A robust and typical tiki swizzle!

Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea

1 oz Rhum JM agricole blanc

1 oz Lost Spirits Polynesian Style rum

0.75 oz fresh lime

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup

1 oz pineapple juice

dash Mozart Chocolate bitters

1 egg white

Shake hard to emulsify the egg white, preferably dry shake first, then strain into a glass filled with cracked ice and partly rimmed, (with brown sugar) and top with grated nutmeg and cinnamon powder and then garnish with a pineapple leaf and speared cocktail cherry.

This drink is strong since the Lost Spirits rum is overproof but it´s still like drinking rum flavored silk…

And here´s a bonus – the rum sauce for pineapple skewers – as simple as it´s delicious, just rum, honey and cinnamon!

Last year at the Tales i went to a pineapple seminar and learnt a lot about this fruit and at the Angostura Rum pool party they served this rum sauce in pineapples to dip pineapple skewers in, a recipe i took with me, very tasty.

Rum Sauce to dip pineapple skewers in

RUM SAUCE

Fill a hollowed out pineapple fruit with rum, dissolved honey and cinnamon sticks. I first placed in a pan 4 oz aged rum (or rums) of choice, 2 roughly crushed Mexican cinnamon sticks (canela) and 2 tsp honey and slowly heated it up (carefully) just to dissolve the honey and let the cinnamon sticks start giving off their flavor.

Then leave to cool and sit for 15-30 min to let the flavors intensify. Then pour in the pineapple and dip pineapple skewers in the rum sauce, it´s delicious! and a perfect party or movie snack.

MxMo pineapple limonata

The limonata is one of my favorite soft drinks…

MxMo pineapple King of Fruits Swizzle 2

This awesome tiki mug is created by Scott Taylor who lives on Maui, Hawaii. if you want to see the awesome and very detailed mugs he makes you can go and check out his pictures on instagram ( type the name tikipop ) 

His shop “Beach Bumz” is one of the stops of Maui Tiki Tours owned by another great tiki mug artist – Rob Hawes – who`s Kala mug i featured in this earlier post. You find his pics on instagram too, (type tikirob) 

King of Fruits Swizzle

A loaded pineapple bowl..

MxMo Pineapple the rums

With potent delicious rums…

Happy Monday!

Making Rhum Arrangè

RHUM ARRANGE ANANAS QUI PLEURE4 BOTTLE SIDE PINEAPPLE

First time i saw rhum arrangè being made by suspending the fruits above the rhum in large jars was when i saw a video from La Rèunion and i got quite curious. There were all kinds of fruits hanging there with all kinds of things (spices) sticking out of the fruits. I had known about rhum arrangè before but not being made that way. So i decided to try some day and now it´s the time.

The style is called in french –  “ananas qui pleure”  (the crying pineapple) since the pineapple is suspended in the jar above the rhum agricole as to not touch the rhum and thus avoiding any flavors from the skin to get into the rhum. This is typically done with citrus fruits which carries bitter flavors in their skin.

But also this kind of maceration above the rhum can be done with any fruits and in the French islands only the imagination is the limit, you see ALL kinds of things in intriguing jars…some you have NO idea what they are…

And there´s for example rhum arrangè with shrimp and snake…i`m actually wondering how it would taste with a crawfish rhum?

The one i`m experimenting with here has New Orleans community coffee pecan-praline coffee beans stuck into one side of the fruit and Tahitian vanilla beans in the other and the beans are cut in the ends so the juice from the pineapple can pass through like a “funnel” through the vanilla bean bringing some of the tiny vanilla seeds along down into the rhum.

And all the pineapple, vanilla-coffee goodness will slowly drop down to flavor the rhum…thus the name “ananas qui pleure…The whole thing will sit like that in the closed jar until the fall, at least 4 months.

I wrote a post about rhum arrangè before and i that post i included that video from the island of la Rèunion where there is a restaurant called Le Saint-Bernard that contains ONLY rhum arrangès (about 400 rhums) of all kinds of flavors made with fruits, roots, spices and God knows what…and many are suspended this way.

Unfortunately (very) the video i first saw is not there anymore but the article (in french) is. The place looks like a veritable laboratory of rhum arrangè, absolutely amazing and a place i`d love to visit.

In my earlier post i wrote about this method of hanging the fruit above the alcohol explaining it:

There´s two different ways of macerating, one is the traditional common way of submerging the fruits and spices into the rum. Then there´s another where you hang the fruits (usually citrus fruits) as they are or with things inserted into the fruits – like coffee beans and hung above the liquid.

The idea is that the aromatics and oils are derived from the citrus and spices without any bitterness from the pith and that´s the reason this method is usually used for citrus fruits.

Here`s a link to a case study with limoncello.

This method is called D.S.M – or Delicious Scientific Magic!!

DSM – or diffusion – The alcohol, exerting a vapor pressure, will diffuse into the lemons saturating the lemon, thus the loss of alcohol in a closed system.

In turn, the lemon oil will also exert a vapor pressure; the lemon smell you get when you cut the skin. It will diffuse out of the lemon and saturate the alcohol.

In the Limoncello post they are talking about high proof or overproof spirits but the traditional rhum arrangè isn`t necessarily done with especially high proof  rhums, i think the common proof is between 45-55%

Here´s one of the videos about the rhums arrangès at Le Saint-Bernard:

Here`s also a link to some pictures of the rhums.

As you can see there´s absolutely no limit of what you can do with rhum arrangè…but what you need is a lot of patience because this ain`t no quick fix!

So here`s what i did to make this variation with pineapple, vanilla and coffee:

1 – Prepare everything you need, jar, rhum or rum, fruit (not too ripe), spices, a string to tie the fruit with. Cut the vanilla beans in half pieces and cut off the top ends. Make sure the jar and the string is clean and the fruit washed.

RHUM ARRANGE ANANAS QUI PLEURE 1

2 – Cut up the fruit to a size that fits the jar and discard the leaves, then cut small holes in the fruit and stick the coffee beans in one side and the vanilla beans in the other (the skin side) I had to cut up this pineapple because it was too big for the jar but one can also use whole fruits with this method.

RHUM ARRANGE ANANAS QUI PLEURE CUT UP FRUIT COLLAGE

3 – Add the rhum to the jar, then the sugarcane syrup (i took one bottle (75 cl rhum) and add 2-3 tsp of sugarcane syrup. (or 15 cl/o.5 oz)

4 – Suspend the fruit to the cover of the jar with strings so that the fruit do not touch the rum and close the jar good and SEAL it hermetically with tape and leave to macerate for a minimum of 4 months ( it can go 6 months without problem or longer, there are rhum arrangès that have been sitting 3-4 years…)

But i think 4-6 month is good for this one. I`m planning to open the jar in the fall and see what i got – exciting…

RHUM ARRANGE ANANAS QUI PLEURE 3 PICS COLLAGE

And that is all!

Cocktails with Rhums Arrangèes – Zwazo

Cocktails with Rhum Arrangé 2

More rhum arrangè cocktails!

So now i have got to try out two very nice rhum arrangèes made by Cèdric Brement and Benoit Bail, and since i wrote my reviews of Benoit´s exotic Zwazo ananas-vanille rhum arrangè and Cèd`s award winning Banane-Cacao, i feel i want to make more drinks with them and see what`s good – starting with the tropical Zwazo.

Even though the traditional way is mostly to drink these rhums neat since they contain so much flavor of their own, they are also used to make tropical punch style cocktails.

I don`t think they have been used very much in tiki style drinks….or have they? in any case it doesn`t hurt if i try right? i`m curious to see how they mix with other rums.

Don the Beachcomber was a master of creating balance with many exotic ingredients – and he was especially skillful when it came to the art of blending rums and so was the original Mai-Kai mixologist Mariano Licudine. One person today that i come to think about getting close in that direction is Martin Cate. (Smuggler´s Cove)

Starting with Zwazo ananas-vanille i needed to find drinks that had ingredients that would harmonize with the pineapple and agricole flavors of the rhum and then switch out the rums used in those drinks for the Zwazo and some other rums that i figured would go well with it.

Cocktails with Rhum Arrangé Book Potions

So i dived into the Bum`s new book the Potions…of the Caribbean for inspiration…and i sure found a lot.The book is filled with the one mouth watering drink after another (apart from all the interesting things there is to read in it) and the first drink that i decided to experiment with was the Siboney, which is a drink by Trader Vic circa 1950`s.

It`s basically a twist on the daiquiri with pineapple juice added and lemon instead of lime plus passionfruit syrup, mixed with Jamaican dark rum (but only 1 oz) I decided to simply just add 1 oz of Zwazo to give the drink more tropical depth.

And top it off with a generous float of something overproof…and my stomach feeling told me to grab my bottle of the Lost Spirits Polynesian Inspired rum.

The result was absolutely delicious! since the recipe called for dark Jamaican rum i took my Denizen Merchant`s Reserve which is a blend of plummer style pot still Jamaican rum and Rhum Grande Arome de la Martinique.

Now Rhum Grande Arome de la Martinique is not rhum agricole even if the name sounds like it – instead it´s molasses based rum.

The reason why it´s in the blend of the Denizen Merchant`s Reserve is that when they checked in with rum cocktail historians during the development process – they were told that Trader Vic likely blended this type of rum from Martinique with the 17 year Wray and Nephew in his original Mai Tai formula because it was cheapest rum available from Martinique at the time. 

Note, that it says “likely” so there´s no proof whether Vic used molasses based Martinique rum or rhum agricole in his blend with Jamaican rum in his Mai Tai`s when the 17 year Wray and Nephew rum was finished.

So here we got a rum that contains pot still Jamaican rum and a molasses based Martinique rhum, and then Zwazo – a rhum arrangè with pineapple and vanilla macerated in a rum base of 3 different rums from Martinique Trinidad and Guyana. 

And don`t forget the overproof Polynesian Inspired float…

It`s a lot of rums going on here…but to my joy the drink tasted fantastic, cool and refreshing yet with a strong rum bite. Deep flavor of mature tropical fruits, and then something “earthy”, maybe from the float of the Polynesian Inspired rum…I like the different layers in a tropical cocktail.

 Siboney – Swazo Style

Cocktails with Rhum Arrangé Siboney 5

1 oz dark Jamaican Rum
1 oz Zwazo
0.5 oz fresh lemon juice
0.5 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
0.5 oz passionfruit syrup
Float of Jamaican style overproof dark rum

Shake well with ice cubes and strain into a chilled cocktail glass rimmed with sugar. (if you like)

Now unfortunately, for the time being, Zwazo is only sold in Europe, locally in Luxembourg and then in Paris at Christian de Montaguère and it´s a small batch seasonal product – so if you cannot find it, my best advice would be to either try to find a pineapple-vanilla rhum arrangè from one of the French islands, such as Martinique (or a pineapple rhum arrangè paired with vanilla syrup) or make your own. (google how to make rhum arrangè, and there´s a great french site with a forum containing tons of recipes here)

Likewise when it comes to the Lost Spirits rums, they are only sold in the US but not Europe or elsewhere…so i would sub them with Smith and Cross mixed with Lemon Hart 151, to get that strong punchy flavor – even though the flavor will not be the same, but since Smith and Cross mixed with LH 151 is a great combo i believe it will still taste fantastic!

Next cocktail to play with was the Island of Martinique Cocktail, which is a Don Beach drink circa 1948. This drink is actually a tikified ti-punch…

It was described in Beachcomber´s 1948 menu as a drink with “Lusty Martinique rums aged in casks for 120 moons. Subtly combined with falernum, wild honey, Angostura bitters and Maui mountain limes”

How does that sound?? mouthwatering to me…

The original recipe which is found in the book Potions of the Caribbean was handed to the Bum by ex-Beachcomber bartender Tony Ramos.

Island of Martinique Cocktail – with a Pineapple Twist

Cocktails with Rhum Arrangé Island of Martinique Cocktail

1 oz rhum agricole vieux
1 oz Zwazo
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
0.5 oz falernum
0.25 oz honey-mix (equal parts honey and water, gently heat it up so the honey dissolves in the water, then cool to room temp)
Dash Angostura bitters
A handful (3 oz) crushed ice
Float Lost Spirits Navy Style Rum on top (or Lemon Hart 151)

Blend at high speed in a blender for 5 seconds, then strain into
a hollowed out pineapple and float the Navy style rum on top.

The drink tasted fruity and spicy, the flavor of fully matured tropical fruit from Zwazo came through and this drink was not as fruity and earthy as the first one but more mellow and spicy, with a kick from the float.

Now let`s dive deeper into this amazing book…

On page 164 i found the Voodoo Grog, a concoction created by Trader Vic, circa mid 1950`s. A drink containing equal parts lime, grapefruit and pimento.

First time i made it i was a bit overwhelmed by the pimento/allspice flavor so i took the Pimento dram down from 0.75 oz to 0.5 and it was better for my palate, but if you like a strong allspice flavor the 0.75 will be good.

Also it matters what brand of pimento dram/allspice dram you are using, the best i think are either homemade or St Elisabeth`s or Bitter Truth. For the moment i have St Elisabeth.

Voodoo Grog

Cocktails with Rhum Arrangé Voodoo Grog filt

1 oz Denizen Merchant`s Reserve Rum
1 oz Swazo
0.75 oz fresh lime juice
0.75 oz grapefruit juice (white)
0.75 oz honey
0.5 oz passion fruit syrup
1 egg white
Grated nutmeg
1 cup (8 oz) Crushed ice

Dissolve honey in lime juice and place this mixture plus the rest of ingredients except for nutmeg in a blender and blend for 20 seconds. Pour unstrained into a large snifter or tiki mug.

Dust with freshly ground nutmeg and garnish with mint and pineapple. (I also wrapped a pandan leaf around the glass)

Last cocktail is the quintessential rhum agricole drink…a ti-punch but with aged rhum agricole and therefore it´s called a punch vieux.

Petit Punch Vieux

Punch Vieux

1 oz Zwazo
1 oz rhum agricole vieux
0.5 oz sirop de canne
One half of a fresh lime

Cut the lime half in two and squeeze both edges into an old fashioned glass. Drop in the first spent wedge in the glass, then rub the rim of the glass with the other and then discard the second wedge. Add sirop, rums and ice and stir to chill. I also did rim the glass with brown sugar and added a sugarcane stick and roughly cut lime peel as garnish.

Rimming the glass with sugar and adding a lime peel is not traditional punch vieux but this is all about experiments!

Sirop de Canne is a thick, dark syrup made from a slow reduction of fresh sugar cane juice. Exported by brands such as Clèment, Dubois, Depaz, Dillon and La Mauny.

You can make a similar syrup by making a rich syrup (2:1 ratio sugar to water) with dark raw sugar.

Punch Vieux is always a nice treat as is the regular Ti-Punch…

Zwazo definitely mixes well in this style of tropical drinks, it gives a deep pineapple/tropical fruit flavor into the drinks which for tiki drinks fits so well into the flavor profile of a lot of them.

The aim with this particular post is to show that you can do a lot with rhum arrangè that goes beyond the traditional use…

Go and check out the Zwazo page on Facebook!

Real McCoy 5 year old Rum – A Premium Rum with Interesting History

Real McCoy bottle

Here´s a very interesting rum produced by the legendary Foursquare distillery that have an interesting and colorful history.

It´s an authentic, handcrafted excellent sipping rum from Barbados bringing that genuine Bajan flavor to your glass.

The Real McCoy rum is based on the story of  William “Bill” McCoy, the pioneer rum runner of the prohibition era, who fueled the Roaring Twenties by delivering over 2 million bottles of rum to the speakeasies of New York back in 1920.

McCoy took pride in the fact that he never paid a cent to organized crime, politicians, or law enforcement for protection and unlike many others that illegally produced and smuggled alcohol for consumption during prohibition, McCoy sold his merchandise unadulterated, uncut and clean,

He never came ashore but instead anchored 3 miles off-shore, which back then was international waters, acting as a floating liquor store within sight of the metropolis of New York.

People went out to McCoy, bought the rum and returned hoping to escape the Coast Guard on the way back in.

An interesting fact about him is that he himself never touched alcohol…(!)

It’s a great story and the rum absolutely lives up to the name. It’s only been in the US for a few months, but it has already received the following accolades:

Silver Medal – San Fransisco World Spirits Competition
“Best in Category”, Aged Rum – The American Distilling Institute
Score 91 – The Tasting Panel Magazine, Anthony Dias Blue
Score 92 – The Ultimate Spirits Challenge, F. Paul Pacult

While researching the life and legend of William McCoy, a Connecticut man became interested in developing a rum in remembrance of McCoy.

So he contracted Richard Seale of Four Square distillery in Barbados, to craft an authentic rum blend and the final result the Real McCoy Rum is nothing but excellent!

Now i sit here with a bottle of the Real McCoy rum – aged for 5 years in American oak bourbon barrels. It´s a  blend of column and pot still rum and what i have here is plain good old-fashioned rum!

I like that…

This is a sipping rum but i`m gonna make a few cocktails with it too – real good quality rums makes real good quality cocktails too – provided that you carefully chose what to mix the rum with. Don´t waste the drinks with ready-made commercial or chemical mixers! use fresh!

 Nose

In the nose i find dried tropical fruits, baked spices, vanilla, caramel and honey – it´s very pleasant…a promising hint of what to come…

The taste

To me it has a distinct aroma of a well aged rum with hints of oak, vanilla, dried tropical fruit, sugarcane and maybe of dried orange peel. It`s a bit on the dry side but has some sweetness. It`s a warm welcoming rum.

The rum also have a long pleasant finish.

I see an image of someone sitting in a comfy sofa in front of a fire in the fall with a sipping glass in hand – or someone on the porch watching a tropical island sunset…

My final conclusion is that i like this rum- it´s of excellent quality but i didn`t expect anything less, seeing to where it´s coming from.

Cocktails

I made two daiquiris with it, one classic with just rum, sugarcane syrup and fresh lime and another with chocolate bitters and pineapple gomme syrup, both were very good.

Then i made a tropical tiki style drink with pineapple juice and coffee that turned out spicy and tasty.

The Real McCoy Rum is excellent for sipping and can be used in classic cocktails as well as well crafted tiki drinks but should not be wasted in drinks like rum and coke.

 Real McCoy Daiquiri

Real McCoy daiquiri

2 oz  Real McCoy Rum

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz brown sugarcane syrup

Stir together in a shaker and strain into a chilled cocktail coupe.

 Back to the Tropics

Real McCoy Back to the Tropics

2 oz Real McCoy Rum

2 oz fresh pineapple juice

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz coffee liqueur ( Fair Cafè or Tia Maria)

Shake with ice and strain into a tiki mug or glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with a pineapple leaf and pineapple chunk or tropical flower.

McCoy Cocoa Daiquiri

Real McCoy Cocoa daiqiri

2 oz  Real McCoy Rum

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz pineapple gomme syrup (or use simple syrup)

2-3 dashes Mozart chocolate bitters

Stir together in a shaker and strain into a chilled cocktail coupe. Garnish with a cinnamon stick.

The Real McCoy Rum website is here.

Happy RUM DAY!

national rum day

Today we celebrate the (Inter) National Rum Day and of course i must make something that contains this noble spirit and make a toast for everyone that have had any part in the invention and creation of this sugarcane spirit called rum, ron or rhum and all who enjoy it and promote it!

This is one of the most varied and versatile spirits on this planet and it´s no secret which spirit i enjoy the most of all – RUM!

So let´s toast for the Rum Day and enjoy a glass or two! i`m in a summer mood so i`m gonna make one of the most common summer rum drinks there is – the Pina Colada which – in my opinion is an underrated drink.

And i`m gonna use a rum that i just recently got to try and which i will review here in a while, the Koloa coconut rum from Hawaii which is made with real coconut.

Also the cream of coconut i`m using here, Coco Real is made with real coconut and not artificial flavorings same as Coco Lopez. If you can`t find cream of coconut (NOT the same as coconut cream which is the thicker coconut milk) the use of coconut milk as substitution or a coconut syrup won`t be the same thing – so try get cream of coconut, it´s a key ingredient.

The name ‘Pina Colada’ literally means ‘strained pineapple’ – a reference to the freshly pressed and strained pineapple juice used in the drink’s preparation. Three Puerto Rican bartenders contest the ownership of their country’s national drink.

Pina Colada

PINA COLADA

2 oz white rum (or you may use gold or dark rum…for a darker more deep flavored version)

2 oz cream of coconut (Coco Lopez or Coco Real)

2 oz pineapple juice (preferably fresh)

1 cup crushed ice

Blend or shake and pour into a suitable glass and garnish with pineapple and cherry. (i didn`t have any cherries on hand so i used a tropical flower instead)

There ya go! Happy Rum Day!

pinacolada instagram

TOTC 2013 – Pineapple! a Symbol of Hospitality!

Pineapple ready for cocktail mixing

The first seminar i went to at this years Tales was about the pineapple. Not so surprisingly i found a lot of the tiki folks in there…

The seminar took us through the history of the pineapple and there was a lot i didn´t know about this royal fruit.

The first wild pineapples came from South America and they had a strong scent of raspberries and were smaller than the pineapples we see today and needed to be pollinated by birds. They were discovered by an indian tribe called Guarani and they made pineapple wine.

In 1654 the pineapple came to Madagascar and then it traveled all around the world. When it finally came to England around the 18-1900th century it was a big thing. The pineapple fruit was really precious and not for the common people to enjoy but was the fruit of the kIngs.

In 1778 Capt Cook brought it to Hawaii and those pineapples he brought must have come from the Kew gardens in England since that was the place they were grown in Europe.

So in Hawaii a man named James Dole planted 50 000 pineapples and on his third year he sold 25 000 cases by his company called Hawaiian Pineapples which later changed to the name we know today – Dole´s.

Then there was a brief decline in the popularity of the pineapple until some bright person invented an “adult pineapple on the go” –  which was a ready made pina colada beverage.

The king of fruits was back! and it`s not anymore the fruit for the kings – but the king of fruits! – and to me the pineapple IS the king of fruits! there´s a reason why i chosed to attend this seminar! and of course we were served a few nice cocktails and a particularly tasty pina colada.

pine sem drink

How to pick a good pineapple fruit

1 – look at the bottom – does it look healthy and fresh?

2 – Outside skin – should be flat and smooth, have a nice pattern – a sign of full development.

3 – Smell – they should have a pronounced smell of pineapple

4 – Give it a squeeze on one of the “points” on the skin, it should slightly give away for pressure.

5 -It should be heavy for it´s size = good and juicy.

I think the pineapple is one of the most versatile fruits out there, you can juice it, grill it, puree, garnish (and elaborately so) make ice creams and sorbets, it goes with grilled food and meats, pairs with a lot of things and it´s a fruit that makes you happy! – what can you NOT do? there´s even a house in Scotland that has a pineapple roof!

Rum sauce ango 5 yo rum honey cnnamon to dip pine peces in

This was served at the Angostura rum pool party, it`s a rum sauce made with Angostura 5 yo rum, cinnamon and honey to dip fresh pieces of pineapple skewers in, do i need to say it was absolutely delicious!

Now y´all can go ahead and make some nice drinks with pineapple in them! this fruit s KING! and here is a recipe for a nice drink:

 Samoan Typhoon

Samoan Typhoon

0.75 oz fresh lime

1 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

1 oz fresh orange juice

0.5 oz liquid honey

0.25 oz sugarcane syrup

0.25 oz passionfruit syrup

2 oz Appleton Extra dark Jamaican rum

0.5 oz  Smith and Cross strong dark Jamaican rum

0.75 oz vanilla flavored vodka (natural homemade with tahitian beans)

2 cups crushed ice

Dissolve honey in lime juice and place in a blender with all other ingredients and blend for 30 seconds. Pour in a tiki mug or tall glass and fill up with more crushed ice.

Garnish with pineapple leaves or slice and if you wish maraschino cherry.

pine sem pine ball

Pineapple sticks served at the seminar.

pine sem set up