MXMO XL – GINGER

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This months Mixology Monday is all about ginger and is hosted by our own RumDood and he says:

For the MxMo: Ginger, participation is relatively simple.

  • Find or concoct a cocktail recipe that uses ginger in one of its many forms as an ingredient.  This can be muddled ginger, sliced ginger, ginger syrup, ginger beer (commercial or homemade), ginger liqueur, ginger candy, or pieces of a shredded photo of Ginger from Gilligan’s Island.
  • Make this recipe, take a picture of it, and then post the recipe, your thoughts about the recipe, and your photo on your blog or at the eGullet Spirits and Cocktails forum.

I think Dood have picked a great theme and no surprise – its very rum-friendly.

Indeed ginger is one of my favorite spices, its one of my essentials and not only for cooking and cocktail mixing and infusions its my no 1 cold remedy as well. You just boil up some chopped ginger root with 1L water and leave overnight to steep, then drink it as tea with milk and honey or just as is.

Using ginger in cocktail mixing – there are almost unlimited options here, you can use the lovely fragrant and biting ginger in so many ways and in so many cocktails. I think ginger pairs exceptionally well with rum but also with cachaca, tequila, mezcal, bourbon..you name it – actually i wonder what ginger wouldn`t pair well with?

As its summer and hot (well..at least its supposed to be but someone told me the Swedish summer has moved to the US)  i wanted to make something refreshing and oh..this wonderful spicy flavor and aroma is so addictive!

Yesterday i passed by the multi-equipped Indian-Caribbean shop here to see if they have yet gotten any more Ting but they didn´t.. so i picked a can of ginger beer instead and decided to use it for this MxMo post.

Then i also decided to make a cocktail that is  gingery in every way i can make it including using ginger leaves for the garnish and here it is:

ZINGIBER COCKTAIL

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1-2 thin slices fresh ginger and 1/4 oz simple syrup – muddle
Add 2 oz dark rum like Appleton extra
Add 0.5 oz JWray overproof
Dash Bob`s ginger bitters
Top with ginger beer

Shake and strain – serve in glass with crushed ice. Garnish slice of ginger and if you have it – a ginger leaf

I really should have made homemade ginger beer but i didn`t have the time – ok i admit…i was lazy –  so i used Old Jamaica ginger beer, more or less the only ginger beer sold here. I find ginger beer to be a lovely cocktail mixer and it goes very well with JWray too.


Well, this cocktail here is all about the ginger really – and rum – and both are friends of mine.

International Cachaca Day

Cachaca – made from distilled cane juice is one of my favorite spirits (after rum 🙂 then again, this is rum`s cousin and its time to celebrate the International Cachaca Day!

International Cachaça Day was started by Sociedade Brasileira da Cachaça, a Brasilian government organization. It was created to commemorate June 12th, 1744: the day when Portugal, then the colonial authority in Brasil, outlawed the production and selling of cachaça.

Cachaca is most commonly used in the all popular caipirinha but also the batida is a refreshing drink and very common too.

Batidas (pronounced ba-chi-da) means “shaken” or “milkshake.” in Portugese. Its cachaca cocktails made with fruit juice or pureed fruit, usually with sugar added. Milk or sweetened condensed milk are also commonly used.

How thick you want it its really up to you, just add more juice if it gets too slushy.

Mango Cardamom Batida

In blender:

2 oz cachaca

3-4 slices of mango

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

Dash cardamom bitters (or use other bitters – then call it just mango batida)

1 oz sweet condensed milk

1 cup crushed ice

Garnish mango slices and mint

Strawberry  Mint Batida

In blender:

2 oz cachaca

3-4 strawberries

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

1 oz sweet condensed milk

2-3 mint leaves

1 cup crushed ice

Garnish fresh mint

So mix up your caipirinhas and batidas and everything else Cachaca.

Rio

2 oz cachaca
1 oz fresh blood orange juice
0.5 oz orgeat
0.5 oz fresh lime juice
3 slices fresh ginger
Ginger ale to top

Muddle the ginger slices with lime juice and orgeat in shaker. Add cachaca. Shake over ice and strain into a rocks glass filled with crushed ice. Top with a splash Ginger Ale.

Garnish blood orange wedges and mint.

Salud!

 

BOLS GENEVER TDN

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Picture by John Hearn – The Bastard´s Booze Blog.

Genever manages to taste like gin and whisky at the same time..Initially gin was very similar to genever, but over time it developed a distinctive style, eliminating malt wine. But the original juniper flavored spirit was genever – originating from Holland.

As always this TDN was fun and educational. Little did i know about the history and making of Bols Genever but that was soon changed when Tal Nadari started to educate us on the history of the making of genever and gin.

There are several recipes for genever but this specific recipe do not use any sugar. There`s Jonge jenever “Jonge” (young) jenever which has been in existence since the 1950`s – and there´s Oude (old) jenever, often spelt as genever, is jenever prepared according to an old recipe.] So “oude” refers to an old “style”, rather than the spirit having been aged.

The malt wine content in actual Jonge Jenevers out there in average is around 5% while oude jenever this is around 20%.The reason why the distillers made a less malt wine genever is that they had just survived two world wars and the supply of grains was low.

Genever (or “jenever”, as it is often spelled in Holland and Belgium, or “genièvre” as is common in France) may only be labeled as such and sold as such in the EU if it is made in Holland, Belgium, the departments 59 (Nord) and 62 (Pas-de-Calais) of France and the provinces Nordrhein-Westfalen and Niedersachsen of Germany according to the European Union in EU declaration 110/2008.

Here´s how Bol´s Genever is made:

It starts with the malt-wine which is based on rye, wheat and corn.The whole grains are milled and treated with malt.The malt has to transfer the starch into fermentable sugars. After addition of the yeast it takes 5 days ( 5 x 24 hours) to finalize the fermentation.These 5 days are very important for the creation of all the critical taste components in the Bols maltwine. In a 3 step distillation( in copper stills) the alcohol percentage reaches 47% abv.

The maltwine needs a maturation period( the marriage time)of several weeks to balance the taste component.Only after this marriage time the maltwine is ready for blending in the final product.

The neutral grain spirit used in Bols Genever is base on wheat. After a 3 days fermentation and a distillation process in 6 copper columns ,the taste of this alcohol at 96% abv is very neutral.

Then the Juniperberry distillate is added. Bols Genever has a slightly juniperberry smell and taste.The juniperberries are soaked in maltwine and after some time distilled in copper pott-stills.

And  the mix of botanicals – as part of the taste profile there´s a mix of botanicals soaked in grain neutral spirit and after some time this mixture is distilled in copper pot- stills.

The final blend is adjusted to 42% abv by adding very neutral tasting de-mineralized water. A marriage time of several weeks is needed after blending to create the smooth, complex and well balanced taste of the 1820 recipe of Bols Genever.

And here are two drinks i fell in love with that night..

Craig Herman from Colonel Tiki created this concoction which i found extremely tasty and it also won the TDN:

G.V.D COCKTAIL

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2 oz Bols Genever
0.5 oz pineapple juice
0.5 oz fresh lemon juioce
0.5 vanilla syrup
3 slices serrano or jalapeno peppers
Pineapple chunks
Angostura bitters – dash

Muddle pineapple & pepper with juices and add the rest of ingredients and shake, strain and serve up.

Garnish lemon twist ( well..i added a jalapeno and a pineapple wedge instead – bec i was too lazy to make a lemon twist….yes for real…it was TDN..)

Then Rick from KaiserPenguin came up with this one – equally tasty…and no joke..the JWray has power.

I like the name – Malt Gasolene = Genever + JWray

MALT GASOLENE

malt-gasolene

2 oz Bols Genever
1 oz Citadelle Reserve
0.5 oz simple syrup
Dash orange bitters
Swizzle and float JWray overproof

There were much more tasty concoctions made, you can sample them at http://twitter.com/mixoloseum

Every week cocktail bloggers, bartenders, enthusiasts, experts, and novices get together for a virtual cocktail party mixing drinks in real time, tweaking, rearranging etc until the night is gone and well into the morning. Join us every thursday at the TDN!

TDN SWIZZLE!

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SWIZZLES GALORE! That´s what this post is all about.

“TDN: The Swizzle Pouring high-proof rum over the bed of crushed ice brings me joy and happiness. But what about gin and Chartreuse? Or vermouth and Peychaud bitters? This coming Thursday we’ll be making more swizzles than you can twirl a stick at. And as voted on by the participants, the best cocktail of the evening will win a bottle of Lemon Hart 151. The ice crushing begins at 7pm EST”

So the swizzle TDN was announced –  and this topic i really liked a lot as i do like swizzles, they both incorporate my beloved crushed ice and really make up some tasty drinks. And never before have i had so many swizzles during on and the same night and many were tasty.

All the swizzlish recipes can be sampled at twitter: http://twitter.com/mixoloseum

The first swizzle that came up, sent in by CraigH over at Colonel Tiki was no joke, the recipe is as follows:

NAVY SWIZZLE

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0 .5 each Lemonhart 151 and Goslings 151,
Cruzan 151 (or Bacardi or Jwray)
0 .5 lime and 0 .5 grapefruit juices
0 .5 honey mix/syrup
Dash bitters
Dash allspice dram

Add to well crushed ice and swizzle till you can’t swizzle no more.

That sturdy rum swizzle to get the TDN take off (and “kill” us in the process) was followed by another very interesting recipe by Angus Winchester, a beautifully subtly spicy creation – the Thai Stick:

THAI STICK

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1.5oz Appleton extra
0.5oz licor 43
0.25oz ginger syrup
0.25oz simple syrup
05oz lime juice

Swizzled in double old fashioned glass with loads of crushed ice and then rub the rim with a kaffir lime leaf

I really like the touch with the kaffir lime leaf rubbed on the rim. As kaffir lime leaves are so strongly flavoured, this is just the right amount of flavour to use. Unfortunately i have saved those i have left from Anita over at Married with Dinner in my freezer for later use in cooking  so first defrosting them for rubbing isn´t be the same thing as using a fresh leaf, but i decided to use it still to get at least some kaffir lime flavour on the glass.

Rick from Kaiserpenguin.com made 2 glorious Cheater`s and Applejack swizzles, both very flavourful which together with other amazing swizzles i`m sure will be featured over at Kaiserpenguin with the usual amazing photos and breathtaking garnishes:

CHEATER´S SWIZZLE

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1oz LH151
1oz Jwray
1oz Grapefruit juice
3/4oz cinnamon syrup
Top with ginger beer, float 1/2oz blackstrap

APPLEJACK SWIZZLE

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2oz applejack
1/2oz Domain de Canton
1/4oz Fernet Branca
3/4oz vanilla syrup syrup
1oz lemon juice

Swizzle with crushed ice, garnish with vanilla. I also dusted a little vanilla powder on top of the ice.

Another swizzle i found refreshing was one of Rumdoods swizzles – the”Wives of Windsor swizzle” it was simple and refreshing, here it is:

WIVES OF WINDSOR SWIZZLE

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2 oz London dry gin
0.5 oz falernum
1 oz grapefruit juice
0.5 simple. syrup

Swizzle in a double-old fashioned glass filled with crushed ice and garnish with mint. This one is fresh and light, a nice change with some gin and citrus, and the Falernum is just right in this drink.

From DJ HawaiianShirt we got the Black Flag Swizzle, another rummy creation using molasses which adds depth, body and a very nice flavour that pairs perfectly with dark and gold rums:

BLACK FLAG SWIZZLE

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0.75 oz dark rum (the drier the better)
0.75 gold rum (heavier body the better)
0.5 oz lime juice
2 tsp molasses
1 dash grenadine

Swizzle with lots of crushed ice in tall glass and garnish with fresh mint.

And finally three of my own swizzles:

BIRD SWIZZLE

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1 oz cachaca
1 oz campari
0.5 lime
¼ oz simple
1.5 oz pineapple juice

Crushed ice, swizzle. Garnish speared pineapple cube with mint and a cherry.

PUNCH SWIZZLE

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1.5 oz Appleton Extra
0.5 oz Lemon Hart 151
0.5 oz simple syrup
Sprinkle of fresh lime
Top with grapefruit juice

Add lots of crushed ice, swizzle and float a little fernet, top with more crushed ice. Garnish mint and lime slices.

LIMONCELLO SWIZZLE

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2 oz gin
Sprinkle of fresh lime
0.5 oz lemoncello
Fresh mint teared
Fill up with crushed ice, top with bitter lemon soda, swizze. Garnish lime.

That`s it folks! a range of swizzles to make us all happy! don`t forget to join again the next thursday, april 30 for the sponsored TDN Beefeater 24!

http://blog.mixoloseum.com/

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Every week cocktail bloggers, bartenders, enthusiasts, experts, and novices get together for a virtual cocktail party mixing drinks in real time, tweaking, rearranging etc until the night is gone and well into the morning. Join us every thursday at the TDN!

Delicana Cachaca

delicana-artisanal-cachacas

Delicana Cachaça is an artisanal cachaca and pure natural product without chemical additives, produced in Minas Gerais and comes in four different expressions: (silver, gold, premium and cinnamon- orange liqueur/ spiced) They are sold in 1 litre bottles. All artisanal cachaca uses cold-pressed sugarcane.

In front of me I have samples of 3 of the cachacas, the silver, gold and the cinnamon-orange liqueur cachaca. The last one I was especailly curious about as its the first spiced cachaca I try and I was very pleasantly surprised. It has nice and natural cinnamon/orange flavor and I believe this one will be very nice as a cocktail ingredient. The bottle has a nice colorful label and its made from 100% natural ingredients.

The silver cachaca is stored several months in jequitiba barrels and its pleasantly mild and flavorful. The gold cachaca is stored in oak barrels and has a more sturdy flavor with more bite as well. It has a vanilla tone and the color is beautifully golden, this one is also very mild. Both the silver and the gold cachacas are 38% ABV or 76 proof.

The natural cocktail for cachaca is fresh and fruity, like the caipirinhas or batidas. I love these fresh fruity cocktails and inspired by the mouth watering L-Stop caipirinha at Cachacagora I decided to mix up a similar drink with the Delicana cachacas paired with 2 of Bob´s bitters.

The Golden Spiced Caipirinha


1/2 lime, end cut off and split into four equal pieces.

Juice of 1/2 a lime

1 ounce of  Lime Sugar (recipe below)

1.5 oz Delicana Gold cachaca

0.75 oz Delicana spiced orange liqueur-cinnamon cachaca

Top with Ting (or other grapefruit soda)

2 dashes grapefruit bitters (I used Bob´s)

Rim the glass with lime  sugar. I made my lime sugar a bit differently and zested one lime and mixed with fine raw canesugar.

Then cut the ends of 1/2 lime and quarter it, add to glass. Add 1 oz fine raw sugar. Muddle and add cachaca, spiced cachaca and bitters. Add crushed ice, stir. Top with a little Ting and add more crushed ice to fill and garnish with a lime wedge and some sprinkled lime-sugar on top.

This drink is so fresh that my brain zings! and there`s a pleasant cinnamon aftertaste.


After this drink I tried the silver cachaca and made a tiki style batida. I haven`t yet seen any cachaca in a tikidrink so I think its about time.

PineappleTiki Batida

I was first going to make a regular batida and then I got to think about that pineapple I had lying about in the kitchen. It had a top that was small and fun looking, and would make a fun garnish. A pineapple top garnish naturally fits a tiki drink and it was then I got the idea to marry the batida with the tiki and thus it became a tiki style batida.


4-6 pineapple chunks from a just matured (not so sweet) pineapple

1 barspoon limesugar

1 barspoon vanilla-orgeat

sprinkle of fresh lime juice

2.5 oz delicana silver cachaca

0.5 oz sweet condensed milk

Dash Bob`s licorice bitters (or other bitters)

Muddle pineapple chunks, sugar and orgeat in shaker, add bitters, sprinkle of lime juice, sweetmilk and cachaca. Shake and strain ( double strain if needed) into a large glass filled with ice. Pour into a large ice filled glass and garnish with a whole (small) pineapple top.

My overall impression with Delicana cachaca is good,  I especially like the gold and I`m intrigued by the orange liqueur – cinnamon spiced, it will be very fun to mix drinks with.

Sugarcane bar

RHUM AGRICOLE AND CACHACA

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RHUM AGRICOLE AND CACHACA?

I´ve read so many articles and seen so much confuison when it comes to what exactly is the difference between rhum agricole and cachaca. And then there`s rhum Barbancourt, is it or is it not a rhum agricole?

So i got the bright (?) idea to write a blog post and try to see if i can sort out what the differences are. I might not have it all clear either. To a large part i have Ed Hamilton and all the fellow members of the Ministry of Rum to thank for what i today know about rums. If i have missed anything or have something wrong here, or if there´s more to it, please feel free to comment.

Cachaça is distilled from fermented sugar cane juice while most (but not all ) rum is a distillate of fermented molasses.

Cachaça is typically distilled to between 38 and 48% abv while rhum agricole in the French islands is distilled to about 72% abv. Then of course, Cachaca must be made in Brazil while rhum agricole if made in Martinique must carry the AOC mark. Some people says cachaca should be called rum and others says rum should be called cachaca..I myself call rum for rum and cachaca is cachaca and rhum agricole is, well..rhum agricole. And sensorial – they taste completely different.

RHUM AGRICOLE

Rhum agricole is made from pure sugar cane juice which has been fermented and fermentation begins within hours of the cane being harvested.

Martinique is the only geographic area in the sugar cane spirits industry, with an Appelation and rhum agricole made in Martinique carries the AOC or Appelation d’origine Controlée mark. Rum from molasses is also produced and its called ‘rhum industriel’ or ‘rhum traditionnel’. Rhum agricole is distilled to about 72% abv.

The rhum agricole that is made in the other french islands such as Guadeloupe, la Reunion etc would probably not meet the AOC requirements since one of the requirements is the type of cane and then geographic areas, drainage, soil type, etc

Rhum agricole is also made in French Guyana and two of the most known brands is La Belle Cabresse and La Cayennaise. These rhum agricoles has a slight different flavor than the agricoles made in Martinique.

La Belle Cabresse for instance is less refined with a spicy floral note and a lot of flavor. I have only tried La Belle Cabresse, but La Cayennaise is said to be sweeter and rounder and a bit less herbal but with a distictive agricole flavor. Very interesting rums.

On the whole, rhum agricoles are very diverse even within the same island. As for the “terroir”, its not just the soil and type of cane that is used, its also the tradition of the spirit which includes the fermentation, distillation, and blending and its not limited to that.

The rhums from Martinique are lighter and more refined than the rhums from Guadeloupe for example, which are heavier and in my own opinion much more “grassy”.

THE AOC

The AOC or Appelation d’Origine Contrôlée mark was adopted by the Martinique distillers in 1996 and it is unique to the rhum of Martinique.

Rhum agricole can be bottled in Martinique or France but i`ve heard they may tighten the regulations so that the AOC mark can only be carried by rhum agricole bottled in Martinique. The Martinique AOC regulations were adopted to improve the quality and value of their products.

RHUM BARBANCOURT

Rhum Barbancourt isn`t considered a rhum agricole even though its made from sugar cane juice. It seems to be in a class of its own. It has been suggested that sometimes the sugar cane juice is mixed with concentrated sugar cane syrup, but i dont know if there´s any evidence for it. There isn`t much information on how this rum is made. It certainly is a very fine and good rum.

There is two versions of the 15 year old Reserve du Domaine. Its the first version that has a serial number on the back and a newer version that is labeled Estate Reserve and that do not have any serial number.

The old Reserve du Domaine is said to be darker, richer and smoother while the new version is a bit sweeter, lighter and a bit less smooth. i haven`t been able to compare them myself.

The difference between them is most likely to be because of the chill filtration on the rums that are for export to non-tropical countries. The chill filtration technique is used to avoid the deposits or haze which could temporarily occur when the bottles are subject to colder temperatures. Its also a commercial process to standardise the product, its even written on Barbancourts home page that they use chill filtration.

Unfortunately the chill filtration removes esters and aldehydes, as well as some of the rums natural oils, which leads to a altering of the flavor profile and general mouthfeel of the rum.

CACHACA

According to Brazilian law cachaça must be distilled from 38 up to 54% alcohol by volume and its bottled at 38-48% abv. Up to 6mg sugar can be added. Cachaça can be made from fresh sugar cane juice or melado which is sugar cane juice which has been reduced but without removing any crystalline sugar out of the juice.

The harvested sugarcane is washed and pressed through large metal rollers to extract the juice and its this first pressing that makes cachaca. The juice is then filtered to extract any cane fragments etc before the process of fermenting. Cachaca is fermented in wooden or copper vats and then boiled down three times and the result is a sticky concentrate.

The aging process yields a cachaça with a smoother taste and most often a yellow or caramel color. Premium cachacas are distilled in such a way that the sugarcane flavor isnt lost. To be labeled “aged” a cachaca must be aged at least one year according to Brazilian law.

Cachaca is traditionally aged in native Brazilian woods that adds distinct flavors and characteristics to the final product and this aging in various rainforest woods is something i find very interesting and i would like to further reserach that topic…

As far as i know they use at least 26 different woods…woods with exotic names such as balsam wood, jequitibá, guarandi, umburana, ipê, jatobá, imburana, cedar, freijó….or garapeira which is used to age for example Abelha Gold – an artisanal  cachaca with lots of flavor and personality that i really like.

Garapeira is a type of native Brazilian Ash which adds it´s own sweetness and spiciness – but without changing the flavor of the cachaca itself contrary to what oak barrel aging does which adds that familiar vanilla or toffee notes that we are used to from molasses rum.

But cachaca isn´t only aged in Brazilian woods, Leblon for example have their cachacas rested or aged in cognac casks while Moleca Gold is aged in oak barrels.

Most often the cachaca producers uses a leavening agent in the production of their cachaca, meaning that during the stage of fermentation they will add corn meal, corn flour or rice bran, to the sugar cane must. And that these grain additions will add distinctive flavors and aromas to the cachaca besides producing the alcohol.

This is a fermentation starter mash that is made from cane juice and toasted corn meal which is generally and tradtionally practised. Traditionally cachaça is fermented using indigenous yeast strains that are naturally occurring in the cane.

Artisanal cachaça is typically made in batch potstills, while industrial cachaça is made with continuous column stills.

Then there is also a third type of cachaca that is made by adding caramel or wood extracts without any aging – called “yellow” cachaca – and the addition of the wood extracts and caramel gives the “yellow” cachaca a much sweeter taste.

So these are the main things that differentiates cachaca from rhum agricole as far as i know. Then when it comes to rum, apart from rhum agricole, its made from molasses, a totally different way to produce this sugar cane spirit.

To round this up i made a ti punch with palmsugar and a ginger caipirinha.

DIRTY VIEUX PALM SUGAR TI POOONCH

1 oz rhum agricole blanc

1 oz rhum agricole vieux

A slice off the side of a lime or as much as you prefer

0.5 oz palm sugar syrup

Start squeezing the lime and drop into the glass. Add the palm sugar syrup and the rhums and stir to mix. Add a cracked ice cube if you like.

FRESH GINGER CAIPIRINHA

2 oz cachaca

0.5-1 oz simple syrup or 1 heaped tblsp raw sugar.

I use raw sugar even though its not dissolving as easily as the traditionally used superfine sugar because i like the flavor of the specific raw sugar i have (Billingtons golden natural unrefined cane sugar) better.

1/2 to 1 lime depending on size. Cut the ends off, then the pith and cut it in pieces.

2 cm piece of fresh ginger,sliced.

Muddle lime, sugar and ginger in a rocks glass, add crushed ice and cachaca, stir well. Fill up with more crushed ice if needed. Garnish with a lime wedge.

Is there anything aside from distillation abv, terroir, AOC and the use of leavening agents that is distictly different about the production of rhum agricole and cachaca? also if there is anything in this post that is not accurate i wanna know so it can be updated if needed, so please comment…