CELEBRATE REPEAL DAY 2010!

Repeal Day on dec 5th commemorates the anniversary of the day the United States repealed the Eighteenth Amendment and gave Americans the constitutional ability to consume alcohol.

If i could i would have attended the Repeal Day Ball in Washington DC held by the DC Craft bartenders Guild – where several of my fellow booze bloggers and cocktailian friends are going. But since i can`t do that i have a tasty cocktail here – its a rum cocktail called Pago Pago and since it contains both muddled pineapple and green Chartreuse and i had all the ingredients on hand i`s right up my alley.This cocktail dates back to circa 1940 and can be found in Beachbum Berry`s Remixed.

PAGO PAGO COCKTAIL

pago-pago1

1 1/2 oz gold rum
1/2 oz lime juice
1/4 oz white Crème de Cacao
1/2 oz green Chartreuse
3 mud­dled pineap­ple slices

Mud­dle pineap­ple slices in a shaker. Add all ingre­di­ents and shake with ice. Strain into chilled cock­tail glass. Garnish with pineapple slice and leaves.

This is a very nice little cocktail, and after one i wanted another..

The green chartreuse and pineapple plays so well together with the rum and lime. But i didn´t feel much from the Creme de Cacao though, let`s see if Mozart Dry can change that.

So since this cocktail only did tease my appetite i decided to make a little twist of it as well since its so tasty and fun to play with. So instead of white Creme de Cacao  i took the ever so tasty Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit and switched out the rum for something more potent like Smith & Cross and to make an interesting flavor some aged cachaca.

Mozart Dry is really one of my favorite spirits and i cannot enough recommend it, this stuff really can transform a cocktail.

PAGO #2

pago-2

1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum
1 oz aged Cachaca ( i used Abelha Gold)
1/2 oz lime juice
1/4 oz Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit
1/4 oz sugarcane syrup (Petit canne)
1/2 oz green Chartreuse
3 muddled pineapple slices

Using Mozart Dry Chooclote spirit really changed things to the better! there wasn´t any pronounced chocolate taste immediately but then in the aftertaste it came…just enough of raw dark chocolate…awesome. The whole drink was nice, and i love Smith & Cross with green Chartreuse!

Happy Repeal Day everyone!

BANKS FIVE ISLAND RUM

banks

This is a very intriguing rum that packs a lot of flavor…and its a white rum with an unusually strong dark rum character.

I don`t think i`ve come across a white rum that has so much of the dark rum flavor before..but on the other hand there´s many white rums i`ve never yet tasted.

I first saw it at the Tales this summer and got me a sample but i wasn´t prepared for how good this rum was. Its an intense white rum which is a blend of rums from five distilleries, each aged between three and twelve years and some is carbon-filtered to get a white color.

According to the label, 5 Island Rum is a “Sophiscated blend of Barrel-Aged rums. Pot stilled Jamaican and light Trinidadian, amber rums from Guyana and Barbados and Indonesian Java.. Enhanced and inspired by the journeys and discoveries of Joseph Banks, a gentleman, botanist and explorer. According to the neck band this is a dry Flavorful rum.

On the nose its light but with the typical Jamaican pot still lingering around. There has been descriptions of this rum with taste notes of both tropical florals, gardenia, citrus blossom, dark chocolate, habanero pepper, smoke, soursop and orange…gingery and peppery..wow..that´s a lot of flavor descriptions!

I find a rich multitude of flavors and among them dried apricot, tropical fruit and a slight buttery sugarcane flavor steadily backed up by the pot-still flavor but there`s no heaviness in this rum, its light and bright and yet it got a slight funk..in a good way – so much flavor. I also find a vegetal note in it..making it very suitable for many mixed drinks.

I would also say this rum is great for a daiquiri.

Banks Five Island Rum is blended in Holland and made for mixing cocktails really, but i find it`s also an excellent sipper. Its been nominated for the Golden Rum Barrel awards 2010 in the classes “Best White Rum”,”Best Premium White Rum” and “Best New Rum brand” – we will soon know the results since they were decided today.

You can soon read more on their website.

This smooth flavorful rum is like i said great for daiquiris..which allows the flavor to speak for itself which a rum like this deserves. But one can also go the other way and make a wild drink.

I´m gonna make a twist of the Witchdoctor which i was introduced and seduced to at Bar Tonique…using mint instead of basil (for garnish only in this drink) since that´s what i got and its always fun trying out new things.

So here we go:

BUSHDOCTOR

bushdoctor

1.5 oz Banks Five Island Rum

1.5 oz Batavia arrak

1/4 – 0.5 oz sugarcane syrup (Petit Canne)

0.5 oz fresh lime

Top with a little soda if you like

Garnish fresh mint

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass with ice, top with a little soda if you like and stick a mint sprig as garnish.

The Witchdoctor uses basil syrup and Smith & Cross, here i replaced the basil syrup with Petit Canne´s deep flavored sugarcane syrup and i think the Batavia arrak mixes well with Banks, increasing the tropical fruitiness and adding some deep mellowness to the drink. No wonder it mixes well with arrak since there´s rum from Indonesia in it.

The crisp clean lightness is still there but there´s a more earthy tone from the arrak with an aftertaste of dried tropical fruit. Basically this is a mojito sans muddled mint but the addition of Batavia arrak changes it into something else – and that´s what makes it a Bush doctor..

The next thing i REALLY had to do was making a Chartreuse Swizzle and since we more or less lived on them in the mixohouse serving them in flower vases communal style every night i took that awesome drink to heart and added it in my regular rotation here and YET i didn´t think about subbing the Smith & Cross with Banks…not until today and of course its a big win! its not a new idea at all, its just me lingering behind..

Then after having a couple sips i came to the conclusion that this is tasty! BUT floating some Smith & Cross would maybe improve it even more and really, it did – it was like adding the final touch if you like. And now..no more messing around!

CHARTREUSE SWIZZLE

chartreuse-swizzle

1 oz Green Chartreuse

1 oz Banks Five Island Rum

1 1/2 oz Pineapple juice

1 oz fresh lime juice

1/4 oz Falernum

2 dash Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters (instead of Angostura)

Float Smith & Cross

Add ingredients to a suitable glass full of crushed ice. Swizzle to mix, float Smith & Cross and garnish with plenty of fresh mint, and add straw.

As good as it can be…and if you switch the pineapple juice for fresh grapefruit juice (white) you´re in for a VERY refreshing drink! The drink in the picture actually is the one with grapefruit juice.

Nothing wrong at all with Angostura but the Bitter Truth`s aromatic bitters added a slight bitter edge that i like.

My conclusion after this experiment is that Banks Five Island Rum is a rum i want to have in my bar regularly.

Sugarcane bar

 

http://www.test-king.com/exams/70-411.htm  http://www.setonhill.edu/  http://www.actualtests.com/exam-100-101.htm
http://www.certkiller.com/exam-MB6-870.htm  http://www.eccouncil.org/

 

MIXOLOGY MONDAY XLX – BROWN, BITTER AND STIRRED

mxmo-brown-and-bitter

I don´t know what happened but it feels like i forgot the last MxMo or there was none…or maybe we`ve all were boozed by Tales of the Cocktail…but now MxMo has come to life again!

Our MxMo host Lindsey Johnson from Lush Life Productions says on her blog Brown and Bitter:

This MxMo will celebrate these styles of drink; whether it’s a basic Manhattan with a tinkered touch of Averna, or a revolutionary mixture of tequila, Campari and pure adrenaline, mix up your favorite brown-booze cocktail and put the details on your blog with a photo by the end of Monday August 30.

Brown spirits yay! this means for me – most of the time:

RUM, RUM and MORE RUM!!

Thank you Lindsey for both hosting and giving me the perfect excuse to completely indulge in RUMS! – AND to play with my new Dandelion&Burdock bitters and a dash or two of my favorite – the Creole Bitters!

Brown, bitter and stirred…doesn`t it sound delisicious?

I decided to go wild with the rums because that`s also deliscious and i wanted two bitters to spice up the drink. The rums chosen are all very flavorful and spicy so the result is a spicy boozy drink.

SUGARCANE AND SPICE

sugarcane-and-spice

1 oz Smith & Cross jamaican Rum

1 oz Old New Orleans Cajun Spice rum

0.5 oz Lemon Hart 151 demerara (if you don´t have this one, use another demerara)

0.5 oz Sugar Cane syrup (Petit Canne)

3 dashes Dandelion & Burdock Bitters

2 dashes Creole Bitters

1 piece of lemon peel for expressing the oil

Stir with ice, pour in a chilled cocktail glass, express the oil from the lemon peel and rim the glass, then discard the peel

Happy Monday! and thank you Linsey for hosting!

mxmologo

CREOLE BITTERS

creole-bitters1

With spring comes new bitters…

Released in Europe while awaiting approval for the US – the Bitter Truth has come up with a stunning product – the Creole Bitters – and they make a spicy intense Sazerac..

The Creole bitters are based on a sampling of a pre-prohibition version of Peychaud’s – which makes them similar to Peychaud`s yet different in that there´s a stronger herbal component here, more earthy/spicy and the nose is strong.The Creole bitters has slightly less of the anise even though anise is the dominating flavor –  with more complexity, spice and bitterness.

I think this its great that we now have these bitters as Peychaud`s is extremely difficult to find outside of the US and some classic cocktails really needs those bitters so with the Creole bitters it will now be possible for many to mix these cocktails and of course here we have a great potential to mix up a range of other exciting cocktails.

What an interesting nose and flavor these bitters have – i can`t exactly put my finger on what all these flavors are…more than “spicy” and hm…familiar yet different. And so of course immediately i wanted to make a Sazerac and then comes an intersting question up as these bitters are spicier than Peychaud`s – a little dash of Angostura or not?

The Sazerac do not originally have that in the recipe but a little dash of Angostura makes a nice Saz..and it`s used quite often together with the Peychaud`s.  But with these spicier bitters now i don´t think we need that.

Another thing that sometimes is used in the Sazerac cocktail is a little vanilla extract and that i can imagine could go quite well with the Creole bitters as well. I´ll try that but not just now – this time its a regular Saz…with only the Creole bitters because after all – i wanted to find out how they were in this cocktail.

SAZERAC

creole-sazerac1

1/2 teaspoon Herbsaint or Absinthe
1 teaspoon of simple syrup or 1 cube of sugar or 1 tsp of granulated sugar
4 dashes Bitter Truth Creole bitters
2 ounces rye whiskey
Strip of lemon peel

Fill a 3-1/2 ounce Old Fashioned (rocks) glass with ice. Place the sugarcube in another glass and moisten it with water until it saturates and crush it or use simple syrup. Mix with whiskey and bitters, add ice and stir to chill.

Discard the ice from the first glass and add herbsaint or absinthe and coat the sides of the glass, then discard the excess (i like to leave a drop or two in the glass) Strain the whiskey into the glass and twist a lemon peel over the glass to express the oils, then rim the glass with it as well. Discard the peel, or if you like use it as garnish – but don`t drop the entire peel back in the glass, it would give too much citrus flavor.

This made for an interesting – more intense and spicier Sazerac. Its actually amazing…

The Creole bitters are not only a lifesaver for those who cannot so easily find Peychaud`s, its also a great addition to the cocktail world and there´ll be many exciting cocktails coming i`m sure. I like Peychaud`s and will not abandon them but i`ll use these just as much and for my part i believe my cocktail experience will be greatly enriched by the Creole bitters. My mind of course also goes to tiki cocktails.

As soon as these bitters are available in the US – folks – go and try them out, you won´t regret it. As for Europe they`re in the shop!

MxMo XLVII: Punch

mxmologo

I have a feeling of slipping in on a banana peel here, i forgot it was monday yesterday..

The topic is punch. There are many different kinds of punch and the host Hobson`s Choice states that “There aren’t really any specific limitations on this month’s subject”  and “Keep in mind that we are at that time of year when there are some wonderful citrus varieties available at the market. And in the warmer climates, we are already seeing the first of the Spring berries.”

There`s along tradition of punches and it would have been interesting to go more into it but i feel i don´t have time now as i need to whip up a cocktail pronto so i`ll keep it simple and mix up another type of punch that belongs to warm tropical days and nights.

I´ll go for lime and i`ll make a punch inspired by the Ti Punch – but not a traditional Ti Punch. The traditional Ti Punch is a simple as its delicate and so well suited for the tropical climate in where it was born.

Its rhum agricole, lime and sugar or cane syrup, maybe an ice cube or two, stirred in a rocks glass.

I`m using rhum agricole too – both aged and white, together with fresh lime juice and palmsugar and raw sugar, Trader Tiki`s exquisite vanilla syrup and then topped with a little Ting ( my faithful companion).

PALMSUGAR PUNCH

palmsugar-punch

1 oz rhum agricole vieux

1 oz rhum agricole blanc

1 tsp palmsugar

1/4 tsp golden raw sugar

1/4  oz Trader Tiki`s vanilla syrup

Lime and mint for garnish

Add ingredients in mixing glass and stir together well with ice, then strain into a punch glass and top with Ting. Garnish with lime and mint. You may adjust the levels of syrup and sugar to your own taste, this drink is forgiving.

This is a drink that talks about summer, well – its not summer yet but i pretend all year that it´s summer.

Happy Monday! (well-tuesday)

Mixology Monday XLVI – All About Absinthe!

mxmologo

Time flies so fast that i did forget about the date and realized today that its time again for Mixology Monday…and how can i not participate when the topic is absinthe?

Its Sonja over at “Thinking of Drinking” who is hosting and she says this:

The topic for February is Absinthe. That much maligned, misunderstood, mistreated spirit, suddenly plentiful again in the US and other parts of the world. Absinthe played a role, whether large or small, in a variety of great cocktails from the 1800’s and early 1900’s – the Sazerac, Absinthe Suissesse, Corpse Reviver No. 2… I’m getting thirsty.

So let’s celebrate absinthe’s history, and it’s future, with all manner of cocktails using absinthe.

Here’s how to participate:

* Find or concoct a recipe using absinthe as an ingredient.
* Make the drink and write about it. Include the recipe, ideally a photo, and something about how you liked (or didn’t like, or tweaked, or…) the drink.

There´s one drink with absinthe that i really like a lot apart from the Sazerac which i`m addicted to, and that`s the Absinthe Suissesse. Its smooth like silk! so fluffy..and good for breakfast. Its actually a classic New Orleans breakfast cocktail originally made with Herbsaint and none could be better and more soothing than this one.

But for this MxMo i wanted to make a twist of something and that something is of course the Suissesse. I really prefer the original recipe but now i`m gonna go astray a bit and change the drops of orange flower water for some Mozart Dry chocolate spirit.

Then i turned down the orgeat from 0.5 oz to 1/4 and used 1 oz milk and 1 oz heavy cream instead of 2 ounces of the cream. I used one whole egg instead of an egg white, i think the whole egg adds more yumminess and roundness to this cocktail. Finally i garnished the glass with a rim of cocoa powder to accent the Mozart Dry.

Mozart Dry is not a chocolate liqueur, its a chocolate spirit and its not on the sweet side, rather dry and very pleasant to mix with or on its own.

CHOCOLATE SUISSESSE

chocolate-suissesse

1-1/2 to 2 ounces absinthe (to taste)
1/4 ounce orgeat (I used trader Tiki`s thick orgeat)
1 whole egg
0.5 oz Mozart Dry
1 oz  milk
1 oz heavy cream
1/2 cup crushed or cubed ice

Either you shake with crushed ice or you blend with ice cubes, i did blend this one.

I also did rim the glass with some cocoa powder to accent the Mozart and make a garnish. I think Mozart Dry did very well in this cocktail, so well that i`m gonna use it more times in my Suissesses.

Happy monday everyone and thanks Sonja for hosting! this drink is exactly what i needed today after coming back home from work turned into an icecube as that`s how cold it is here now. The Suissesse warmed me up!