TDN NUKU HIVA

These days i rarely attend the TDNs since i`m not at the same lazy job i used to have in the good old days when i attended every thursday….:-) mind you, the TDN starts in the middle of the night where i am…but who can resist mixing up a tiki drink for TDN Nuku Hiva?

For those who doesn`t know, TDN stands for “Thursday Drink Night” and is a online gathering and celebration (but some also meet in person, i have done a TDN once in the US with Kaiserpenguin for example and i think i did one from New Orleans too) of cocktail mixing with cocktail bloggers, spirits writers, bartenders, and drinks enthusiasts.

It takes place on thursday nights, once a week mostly to chat and mix up tasty and sometimes crazy cocktails based on a given theme which can be a particular spirit, mixer, bitters, fruit, memorial or something else.

This thursday the theme was Nuku Hiva.

I have special appreciation for Polynesia and i have spent time reading many books about French Polynesia and the Marquesas islands over the years whose history i find fascinating. The Marquesas are a chain of ten large mountainous islands and some smaller islets in east-central Polynesia and it`s ancient name is Henua Enana – The land of men.

These are some of the most remote islands in Polynesia with a rich history as wild as the beautiful nature.

But the TDN topic Nuku Hiva have a scary back story…

This is what the Mixoloseum blog writes:

[The] theme will be “Nuku Hiva” based on recent events on that tropical Polynesian island. A little back story:

In early October, the charred remains of a German adventurer were discovered at a campfire site on a South Pacific island. The tabloid media were quick to portray the slaying as a possible case of cannibalism on Nuku Hiva, an island historically known for human sacrifice. But locals are offended and experts say such killings are a thing of the very distant past.

You can read the rest of the story here. Seems to me like a one mad man crime and i believe these sort of crimes are unusual there. But it´s not that sad and disturbing story that is the reason for inspiration of this TDN but rather the outstanding potential of tiki material here.

So this was the rule – Make a tiki drink with at least one German ingredient, bonus points if you use fire. Participants could log in to the Mixoloseum chat room to mix it up in real time with the rest of the boozenerds.

So i don´t need much encouragement to get going with a tiki drink and so a drink inspired by the Marquesan island Nuku Hiva i did and with fire of course, properly served in a tiki mug:

NUKU HIVA WARRIOR


1 oz Smith & Cross

1 oz Cruzan blackstrap

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup

0.25 oz FairTrade Coffee liqueur(or other)

0.25 oz The Bitter Truth Pimento Dram

1 oz pineapple juice

Shake hard with ice and strain into tiki mug with filled with crisp glistering crushed ice and throw in a fresh mint sprig. Or make it the way i did with a ice-cone.

Place half limeshell on top filled with overproof rum and set on fire.

HOW TO MAKE THE ICE CONE

Fill a pilsener glass with shaved or crushed ice and stick a straw through it all the way to the bottom. Put in freezer overnight. Next day warm up the glass with hot water so the cone slides out off the glass and then melt enough at the top to expose enough straw to drink from. Put in glass.

Okole Maluna!

Here´s the link to the drinks that were made that night on twitter.

MIRACLE MILE BITTERS

During Tales there´s always some bitters going around and i now have  five new bitters to play with and first out are 2 bitters from Miracle Miles – Chili-Chocolate and Yuzu.

Miracle Miles bitters are locally made artisanal bitters that started just over a year and a half ago. Louis Anderman – the maker of these bitters became friends with Joe Keeper from Barkeeper (an awesome barware shop n LA) and would always bring him some of his homemade experiments, bitters, Nocino, etc.

In December ’09 he did the Chocolate/Chili bitters, and Joe flipped over them and begged  for some. Louis tweaked the recipe a bit for the next batch and gave some to Joe, then after refilling his bottle for the second time in about 3 weeks he said, “Hey, why don’t you start selling these here?”

Then more and more bars started picking them up, and all of a sudden Louis was getting so much other momentum (e.g., interest from distributors) that he realized he was reaching a point where he had to go pro, or go home.

The varieties Louis currently makes are: Chocolate/Chili Bitters,
Gingerbread Bitters, Castilian Bitters, Sour Cherry Bitters, Yuzu Bitters, Forbidden Bitters and finally Orange Bitters.

That`s a bunch! and i don`t think they are out for purchase yet so i`m very happy i have got 2 of them.

CHILI-CHOCOLATE BITTERS

The chili-chocolate is made with fine Vahlrona chocolates and a mix of chilis.

In the nose you feel an exquisite and fine chocolate smell and when you taste it it´s there together with ginger, allspice and nutmeg, sweetened with molasses and maple syrup – with a slight chili bite.

The chocolate-chili bitters are perfect for dark rum drinks as well as bourbon, rye, tequila and well – any dark spirits really – anything that goes with well chocolate.

People also use them on ice-cream and coffee..mmm – i´m gonna try them with my blend of Community Coffee Nola blend with chickory and Pecan-Praline…oh my..

I stumbled upon a drink when i was sitting and reading an article about whiskey cocktails in Hawaii. Since ii like both cocktails, whiskey and Hawaii they had my attention.

The drink i was reading about – The Whiskey Thatcher – really looked interesting to me and looked like something where the chili-chocolate bitters would add a nice spicy touch. (btw the Whiskey Thatcher is a variation of a gin drink named after former British prime minister Margaret Thatcher- but don´t mix things up now…i`m not promoting Thatcher…and this blog is totally politics-free – i`m promoting booze!)

The Whiskey Thatcher was created by Dave Newman, bar manager of Nobu, Honolulu, Hawaii who was wondering if the Thatcher would work with whiskey which apparently it did.

Today people want spirits with more character – and i see whiskey coming back and also other flavorful, handcrafted spirits like rum, tequila and mezcal. Even vodka producers are going in that direction creating small batch vodkas with flavor – one example is Karlsson´s which contains 12 different potatoes.

The Whiskey Thatcher blends citrus and sweet, herbal and bitter with the depth and roundness of the whiskey. And besides, anything that contains campari is worth trying i think.

So here we go – the Whiskey Thatcher with dashes of chili-chocolate bitters!

WHISKEY THATCHER


0.5 oz Campari

2-3 mint leaves

A strip of lemon peel

1 tsp fine sugar. (i used Oxfam`s raw sugar)

1. 75 oz Bourbon

Hibiscus syrup ( a splash)

Bourbon ( a splash)

Top with dashes of Miracle Mile Chili-Chocolate bitters

Muddle a slice of lemon peel, two or three mint leaves, 1/2 ounce Campari and 1 teaspoon of fine sugar in a mixing glass.

Add 1. 75 oz bourbon, and a splash of hibiscus syrup and fresh juice from half a lime.

Shake with ice.

Put a splash of pernod and a splash of bourbon (the recipe calls for Wild Turkey but i had Maker`s Mark on hand) in the bottom of another (slightly preheated) lowball glass, light it on fire and burn off the whiskey and pernod. And fresh ice; and strain the drink from the first glass into the prepared glass and stir.

Top off with dashes of the chili-chocolate bitters. (I added a generous amount of dashes..)

Garnish with a fresh mint sprig and if you feel like it a lemon peel as well. (The garnish is not in the original recipe)

Yeah…I like it…it´s spicy…

From that i moved on to mix me this next drink because Louis told me to try it –  2oz demerara rum, 1/2 oz pineapple gomme, 2-3 dashes chocolate/chili bitters, built like an old fashioned – and indeed it was good – very aromatic and deep.

YUZU BITTERS

Now after these two very satisfying cocktails with dark rums it was time to try out the Yuzu bitters.

Released only a few months ago, it’s quickly catching up to the Chocolate/Chili in popularity in LA, and KL Wines in SF sold out of a full case within five days. In addition to the yuzu, cinchona is used for the bitter plus cardamom, cinnamon, and burdock root among the other spices, and two kinds of green tea to round out the finish.

The flavor of the yuzu bitters is something in between a lemon and a tangerine, with a deep citrus flavor. Yuzu is a citrus fruit rom SE Asia and which is a cross between sour mandarine and Ichang papeda – Citrus ichangensis × C. reticulata

Here`s a link to pictures of Yuzu.

These bitters would go well with anything that goes with citrus and i`m sure also with herbal liqueurs and so therefore i decided to try a variant of the Chartreuse swizzle adding Yuzu bitters thus turning it into a Yuzu Swizzle.

YUZU SWIZZLE


1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
0.75 oz Lime Juice
1/4 oz Falernum (i used B.G Reynold`s Dark Falernum)
3 dahses of Miracle Mile Yuzu bitters

Add ingredients to a large glass full of crushed ice. Swizzle to mix, lavishly garnish with mint, squeeze a bit and add a few extra dashes of the bitters on top of the ice as well.

After trying this i can say that it is tasty – no doubt – but i wonder if the yuzu and the green chartreuse might play out each other a bit…i cannot detect the flavors of the yuzu so clearly. Nevertheless – tasty it is. But i needed something “cleaner” to give the yuzu bitters space to play and the flavors to shine a bit more..

So how`bout a Yuzu daiquiri?

Hell yeah! and this is what i used:

2 Havana Club 3 yo

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup

3 dashes yuzu bitters

Float Coruba overproof

Now this was better in the sense of putting the yuzu flavors more forward and a Daiquiri is always a very nice cocktail – one of my favorite cocktails.

This has been fun and i`m very pleased with the Miracle Miles bitters, go try them when you get a chance.

And finally – try Yuzu bitters on oysters…

OLD CUBAN AND A HINT OF CHOCOLATE

After doing so many Mixing through Grog Log posts filled with tasty tiki drinks i now feel like doing a classic rum drink and was reminded of the Old Cuban cocktail by Douglas Ford over at Cold Glass.

The Old Cuban cocktail was invented by Audrey Saunders of New York’s Pegu Club and the original recipe used Bacardi 8 rum. But i didn´t have the Bacardi 8 either and so i reached for Smith & Cross. This is an excellent rum cocktail and very nice now when it´s summer.

Think of this cocktail as a grown-up mojito with a bit more complexity and aroma.

THE OLD CUBAN COCKTAIL


1.5 oz dark rum (Smith and Cross)
1 oz simple suger (Demerara)
0.75 oz fresh lime juice
1–2 dashes Angostura bitters, to taste
6 leaves of fresh mint
sparkling wine to top (champagne or prosecco)

Muddle mint and juiced lime hulls lightly. Add rum, syrup, bitters and lime juice. Shake until well chilled. Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Top up with champagne or prosecco. Garnish with mint or sugared vanilla.

I wanted to make a twist of it as well staying true to my habit of playing around with cocktails. I´m somewhat into chocolate right now for some reason and so i decided to add some chocolate flavors to the party adding a little bit of the excellent Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit, a dash xocolatel mole bitters and a whiff of fresh chocolate mint and came up with the Chocolate Cuban.

Here´s the recipe, hope it pleases somebody:

CHOCOLATE CUBAN


1.5 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum
0.5 oz demerara sugar syrup
0.5 oz fresh lime
0.5 oz Mozart Dry chocolate spirit
1-2 dashes xocolatl mole bitters
6-8 leaves fresh chocolate mint
Prosecco to top

Muddle mint and juiced lime hulls lightly, be careful with the mint, it will become bitter if muddled too hard.

Add rum, Mozart Dry, xocolatl mole bitters and lime juice and shake well with ice cubes.
Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with mint and/or sugared vanilla.

I think chocolate goes very well with the Old Cuban and chocolate and vanilla are as we know old lovers. I really like the chocolate version of the Old Cuban.

These two cocktails are perfect on a warm summer evening, try them!

GARRETT`S MAITINI AND PELE´S BREATH

Browsing through Remixed i always stops at the picture of Garrett`s Maitini – it looks so deliscious! i have of course since long been thinking of making it but never got that far until now.

I need to switch out the rum though since i don´t have Bacardi 8. As you can see from the name this drink is based upon the Mai Tai but uses orange and kalamansi juices.

Kalamansi is a citrus fruit from the Phillippines and south east China (Citrus microcarpa) also called kalamondin, which is is a cross between Citrus reticulata (Mandarin orange group) and Fortunella japonica (Kumquat group) and it really has a taste of its own which is a combination of sweet and sour, like a cross between lime and tangerine.

That is due to the fruit meat is sour while the peel is sweet so when making the juice the whole fruit is crushed.

I can`t get the fresh ones here, only bottled and because of that i decided to mix the bottled juice with some fresh lime juice to pimp up the freshness. Kalamansi has such a unique flavor that is cannot be substituted and if you cannot find it, the only thing left is to use fresh lime, preferably key limes.

I laugh at the name “MaiTini” though..the “tini” part that is…but drink names can really be silly. Anyway there´s nothing silly about the drink itself.

Since i didn´t have any Bacardi 8 i decided to try the combo of 1.5 oz Smith & Cross ( my no 1 to-go rum nowadays unless it´s a demerara i need) and 0.5 oz Old New Orleans Cajun Spice plus 0.25 oz overproof Pusser´s.

It turned out good…

GARRETT`S MAITINI

1.5 oz Bacardi 8 rum

0.5 oz orgeat

0.5 oz orange curacao

0.5 oz fresh orange juice

0.5 oz fresh kalamansi lime juice

Dark jamaican rum float

Shake ingredients with ice cubes and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange peel and three of your spent kalamansi lime shells filled with dark jamaican rum. If using an ordinary lime, one spent half shell is enough, the glass gets crowded anyway.

i like this drink, especially now when the summer is on the way. Its a bit on the sour side and very fruitylisciously tasty! exotic, fruity and most important – rummy.

So what to do now for a twist of this? well i took my bottle of Abelha gold aged cachaca to mix with the Smith & Cross and ONO Cajun Spice, grapefruit juice instead of orange and  4 muddled Louisiana community coffee beans.

We´re far away from the Mai Tai now..very far so it´s a new drink, not even a Mai Tai twist anymore.

PELE´S BREATH


1 oz Smith & Cross

0.5 oz aged cachaca

0.5 oz Old New Orleans Cajun Spice rum

0.5 oz orgeat

0.5 oz fresh grapefruit juice (yellow)

0.5 oz fresh kalamansi lime juice

0.5 oz sugarcane syrup

4 Community Coffee beans

Overproof rum float ( to set on fire)

Muddle coffee beans with orgeat and fresh lime. Add rums, aged cachaca, kalamansi and grapefruit juices. Shake hard with ice cubes.

Double strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with fresh mint and speared cherry. Float a spent lime shell on top of the drink, fill with overproof rum and set alight.

Oh my…this is a nice drink! the very fine and yet robust flavor from the muddled coffee beans from one of the best coffees in the world is exquisite.

Since i first tried Community coffee from New Orleans i never drink anything else (except sometimes – either Jamaican Blue Mountain or Hawaiian Kona coffee), nothing else will do. But if you cannot find Community, Kona or Blue Mountain coffee, make sure to use strongly roasted beans.

I greatly prefer the natural and not overpowering flavor from real coffee beans rather than a coffee liqueur, it really makes a difference.

Together with the grapefruit juice there´s a contrasst that i like a lot and the fresh lime and kalamansi adds that extra zing to it. Then the blend of rums..it´s simply deliscious.

You don´t need to set a lime shell on fire to appreciate this drink, that´s more for the fun of it – it´s fun to sprinkle some cinnamon over the flame to get it going and i have to admit that the burnt demerara adds a slightly smoky touch too..

I guess this is one of my better drinks..what a luck!

SWIZZLES part 2 – Chartreuse Swizzle with Caramelized Demerara Sugar

Like i said before – the green Chartreuse is the elixir of pure pleasure! a little of it and its like magic drops transforms an average drink into a potion of dreams..

We keep swizzlin`…and the next swizzle i`m gonna make is my favorite and many other´s favorite too – – the famous Chartreuse Swizzle – i was even asked to include it in my swizzle series by my good blogger pal and friend Craig Hermann over at  Colonel Tiki

I´ve had it on my blog before and it has been on other blogs too but this swizzle is sooo damned good that you can`t make too many. The interplay of flavors and herbal notes is wonderful and i wonder if this one isn´t addictive..

But note one thing – the original recipe doesn`t contain any rum, that`s something that has been added by various people to pimp it up and with good results me thinks..

I´m also gonna try that thing i read about with the lime wedge – you sprinkle sugar over a lime wedge, pour bit of Chartreuse over it, light it and let the sugar caramelize. Cool a bit, then squeeze and drop the lime into the glass – with one half sticking up as garnish a bit above the extra top layer of crushed ice.

This will hopefully add a layer of caramelized dark sugar to the drink..hm not a bad idea, let´s see if it works.

CHARTREUSE SWIZZLE – With Caramelized Demerara Sugar


1 oz Green Chartreuse
1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum
1 1/2 oz Pineapple Juice
0.75 oz Lime Juice
1/4 oz Falernum (i used Trader Tiki`s Dark Falernum)
2 dash Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters ( a few dashes  on top of the ice too)
Caramelized demerara sugar-lime

Start making the caramelized sugared lime first and put aside to cool. See instructions above.

Add ingredients to a large glass full of crushed ice. Swizzle to mix, lavishly garnish with mint, squeeze a bit and drop in the caramelized sugared lime and add straw – in the mint.

Well, first of all – chartreuse doesn`t burn so well so i took just a little bit of Lemon Hart 151, very little since i don´t really wanna burn it, it´s precious. But a half teaspoon is ok, for once – i won´t do this very often. Actually – it´s more of a fun experiment. So one half teaspoon of each is what i used.

After burning the sugar and lime i wasn´t content, i wanted a more burnt flavor and the lime to also look a bit burnt so i decided to grill it.

The end result is a bit of a spicy Chartreuse Swizzle and it´s tasty of course. But if the spiciness comes from the grilled sugared lime or the aromatic bitters i cannot say, it`s probably both.

This is a drink i can drink plenty of and it´s fun to play around with it – it´s that kinda drink.

THE MAGIC OF ICE MOLDED TIKI DRINKS

del-coronado-23

The magic of ice molded tiki drinks…

I wrote about it long ago but i feel it`s time to re-visit this topic. It`s not very often you see people write about ice-molds but here`s a post over at Let`s Tiki. The first time i saw a picture of a tiki drink with an ice mold of some kind was the cocktail chronicles post about the Luau Grog. it had that ice-cone you make in a pilsener glass. That picture was enough to make me dream..Then i saw a few pictures of the Dr Funk`s Son cocktail served in an entire ice-mold around the glass. The rest i saw in Beachbum Berry´s books and i was intrigued.

I made my first attempts in 2008 and made the Dr Funk`s Son and experimented with both crushed and plain ice molds around the glass with various results. I made a blog post about the other attempts to make ice molds as well. I found it to be difficult without an ice-shaver since you need fine ice for the molding made easier and with good results. I used a hand-mixer to get the crushed ice  become more fine.

I had to (and still have to) first crush the ice and since my hand-mixer is broken down i need to beat it with a mortar to become easier to mold. Since i let the ice cubes stay out for a little while to soften it`s necessary to work quickly cuz the melting goes fast. You mold the shape you want and then place it in the freezer for at least 2 hours before using in the drinks. They used to serve tiki drinks with ice molds back in the days…but in our time it`s a rare thing, but i`ve heard they does it in Mai Kai. It would be a very cool experience to order a few drinks served that way.

We know that we drink with our eyes too and how a drink is presented whether it has garnish or no garnish is very important and affects the whole drinking experience. And the ice molds has a way of transforming the feel when you have them in your hand, there`s something magic about them. Add to that the fact that a tiki drink in itself  has a magic feeling especially if you`re in a dark tiki bar with the right atmosphere. But that`s the whole point of tiki – escapism.

I`m gonna present a few drinks and ice molds that you easily can make yourself. If you have an ice shaver you`ll get much better results than i can get with just roughly crushed ice.nThe first drink is basically a raw chocolate Mai Tai served in an ice tower.

1) ICE TOWER

To make this ice-tower you need a glass and a plastic (or other) container that is larger than the glass, so you can put crushed or shaved ice and fill up with water in between after you place the smaller glass in the larger container. Make sure the glass is no taller than the outer container.

My glass did start to float a bit so i did place a stone on it. Then you put it in the freezer for at least 2 hours (or overnight). Then you hold the container under hot water until the ice/glass inside is loosened.

Then i did put it back in the freezer for another 30 min so it could freeze back a bit more before using it.

Here`s a basic Mai Tai, Trader Vic`s recipe but one ingredient is added, not much but the change produces a new cocktail – bittersweet, dry and crisp with a hint of vanilla – that`s the the Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit and only 1/4 oz is added.

But that`s enough to change the drink. Since Mozart Dry is quite concentrated and has that crisp dryness you only need a little to create a very nice contrast. To go with the raw chocolate i used chocolate mint for garnish – and really, the leaves does have a decadent fragrance of peppermint and chocolate. (menta x piperita f. citrata “chocolate”) Its truly delicious! make sure the straws are short and placed near the mint.

Since it´s a new ingredient added i give the drink a different name even though basically it`s a strong chocolate flavored Mai Tai – served in the same kinda cool ice-tower as Dr Funk`s son.

PRINCESS PUPULU

princess-pupulu

1 oz demerara rum

0.5 oz Smith & Cross

0.5 oz Pusser`s overproof

1 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz orange curacao

0.25 oz orgeat

0.25 oz simple syrup

That`s the Mai Tai – now add:

0.25 oz Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit

Shake with the spent lime shell in the shaker with crushed ice and pour unstrained into the ice tower, fill up with more crushed ice if needed.

Garnish with chocolate mint and speared cherry/pineapple chunk.

princess-pupulu4-jpg1

From above the thin layer of ice on the glass is seen.

princess-pupulu-3

2) ICE SHELL

The next drink has a shell made with crushed ice like the drink in the pic on the top of this blog post – Del Coronado

To make an ice shell you fill the glass with shaved (or crushed) ice and with a spoon press on the ice so it goes upward and forming a shell around the edge of the glass –  pretty cool. To get this really nice you need an ice shaver. The ice-shells can be made a bit differently, some to look like a hood half over the glass, like an ice cave. While others are a thin wall of ice sticking up irregularly around the edge of the glass.

An ice-shell made with crushed ice instead of finely shaved may look a bit clumsy but it still works, it manages to add that mystic feeling of old tiki times gone by…and as for chilling the glass the ice-molds does that very well.

I have chosen a drink from Jeff`s latest book the Remixed that i like a lot to be served with the ice-shell.

PAGO PAGO COCKTAIL

pago-pago-cocktail-5

3 squares of fresh pineapple

0.5 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz green Chartreuse

0.25 oz Creme de Cacao ( i instead used Mozart Dry Chocolate Spirit)

1.5 oz gold Puerto Rican Rum ( ain`t got that..i used Smith & Cross)

Place pineapple, lime, chartreuse and cacao in a shaker and muddle. Add rum and ice cubes and shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass but in this case a glass with an ice shell.

The Pago Pago Cocktail dates back to 1940.

3) THE ICE CONE

Then we have the ice-cone as seen being served with the Captain´s Grog, Navy Grog and the Luau Grog. Its easy to make, just pack a pilsener glass full with shaved or crushed ice and place a straw in the middle, then freeze for at least 2 hours or even better, overnight.

When you take it out, pour warm water over the glass so the cone comes out.

I´m gonna use it in the Kon Tiki Ti-Punch from Remixed (page 202)

KON TIKI TI-PUNCH

kon-tiki-ti-punch-with-ice-cone

0.75 oz fresh lime juice

0.5 oz grenadine ( i used hibiscus grenadine)

1.75 oz Bacardi 8 rum ( didn`t have that so i used an aged agricole instead to change it up a bit)

1 tsp demerara syrup ( i used rich demerara syrup which is 2:1 demerara sugar to water)

tsp Guava jelly ( well..another hard to find ingredient..i used Guava jam)

A chunk of fresh pineapple

In your shaker, muddle the pineapple chunk and guava jelly in lime juice. Add rum, grenadine and demerara syrup.

Shake and strain into a punch goblet (or rocks glass) filled with a large ice cube – here replaced with the ice-cone.

Garnish with a lime wedge, pineapple chunk and mint sprig.

This drink was really nice with an aged rhum agricole. I used Clemènt VSOP and then i also added a small float of Pusser´s overproof…i like to kick up my drinks a little bit.

Finally, all i can say about using ice molds is that yes, it does take some time and effort to do them so i won´t do them very often..but when i do..oh my, it really is a special feeling to drink with an ice mold in the glass – but bear in mind that these molds here are really not very good because without finely shaved ice you cannot get that look the old ice molds have. For some reason shave ice devices are not sold here where I live so it´s a bit difficult.

And one more thing, when you work with the ice it`s easier with ice that has softened a bit and that requires that you work not too slow. When the molds are ready it`s good to let them freeze overnight. I did freeze mine for 2 hours but that was mainly because i wanted to et going with the photographing of the drinks. The molds doesn`t melt as fast as you may think, they keep quite good – at least long enough to imbibe the drink, especially if the molds are left to freeze overnight.

 

Sugarcane bar

MIXING TROUGH GROG LOG 15 – Colonel Beach`s Plantation Punch

colonel-beachs-plantation-punch-close

Here we have one of those genuine steady tropical tiki punches, made to relax with in a rattan chair while the sun sets and the cikadas start their nightly concert.

Made by Donn Beach and most likely as is stated already in the Log, a drink made for his steak and coffee house “The Colonel´s Plantation Beef Steak and Coffee House” in Waikiki Hawaii cirka 1950s. Sounds to me that those were the days..can someone please invent a real time-machine?

Thank God these recipes are still here (many due to some peoples hard work) so we can enjoy these drinks in our time.

All the ingredients in this drink are classic tiki cocktail ingredients including the pernod, one of the secrets at the time. This is a very rewarding drink to sip on. i think the ginger beer adds a very nice freshness while the three rums adds depth and complexity.

What you can do, if you wanna add some real funk to this drink is to make your own ginger beer, i bet it would make a fantastic flavor to this. I don´t have the time now to do that but i think i wanna try. That will have to be another blog post.

COLONEL BEACH´S PLANTATION PUNCH

colonel-beachs-plantation-punch

1 oz fresh lime juice

2 oz unsweetened pineapple juice

0.5 oz falernum

2 oz ginger beer

2 dashes angostura bitters

1/8 tsp pernod

2 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 oz gold Puerto Rican rum

0.5 oz Barbados rum

Shake with one cup crushed ice- Pour into tall glass with 3-4 ice cubes. Garnish with pineapple chunk and sprig of mint.

Well, i used a tiki mug instead..one that i find suitable for a plantation punch and which i found on the shelves in one of New Orleans liqueur stores.

The taste of the drink is both fresh, rummy and relaxed, just the way this kinda drink should be. I have nothing to complain on here.

And as usual, here´s a little twist of this drink and we move from the rattan chair to the beach, here`s a Beach Punch:

COLONEL BEACH PUNCH

colonel-beach-punch

0.75 oz fresh lime

1.5 oz pineapple juice

1.5 oz root beer

2-3 dash Creole bitters or Peychaud`s

0.5 oz demerara simple syrup

1 oz dark Jamaican rum (Smith & Cross)

1 oz aged rhum agricole

0.5 oz LH 151

Shake with crushed ice and pour everything into a glass or tiki mug.

A typical tiki punch with extra flavors from the root beer. Nothing that sticks out but its relaxing and tasty. If you take the mint garnish and down it in the drink and stir a bit you`ll start to think about a julep sans bourbon.

colonel-beach-punch-2

A peek in the glass..are you thirsty now?

colonel-beach-punch-in-the-glass