MAI TAI TWISTS – let´s have some fun!

Moving on to the topic of Mai Tai twists from the last post about how to do the original Mai Tai right…

So it´s time to play! the goal here is to stay somewhat true to the Trader Vic´s recipe with only some slight changes because i don´t wanna loose too much of the Mai Tai formula..but true Mai Tais it ain´t anymore…

The garnish is changed all the way out though, not a mint to be seen…,not that i don´t like mint and i`m a purist when it comes to the original Mai Tai but it´s refreshing to play with something else. I was going to try to find hibiscus buds but alas no hibiscus anywhere…I did find a red bromeliad flower though and some green dracaena leaves.

I really enjoy walking around in the fruit and plant/flower markets looking for interesting stuff for garnish and to go in the drinks!

Mai Tai twists – i`m all for it and what is tasty or not is so personal. Some find for example the Bitter Mai Tai gross and even an abomination – i find it tasty but then again i`m a Campari geek. In fact i like it so much i even made a twist of it..

BITTER CHOCOLATE MAI TAI


1½ oz Campari

¾ oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum

1 oz lime juice (save the spent lime shell to go in the shaker)

¾ oz orgeat

½ oz orange Curaçao

3 dashes Mozart Chocolate bitters

Shake and strain into a double old fashioned or other glass and sink the spent lime shell into the drink. Garnish with a sprig of fresh mint, or something tropical.

What is done here? well, one of the rums is switched for Campari and chocolate bitters are added. Not a Mai Tai anymore… and that´s why it has “Bitter Chocolate” in the name.

A lot of what i write here is obvious for many of us, so all of you who already know these things please bear with me…there are many out there who wanna learn.

The addition of Campari for one of the rums is not my invention, the Bitter Mai Tai was created by Jeremy Oertel at Dram in Brooklyn, NYC. I only added the chocolate bitters to the party. There´s also a bitter Mai Tai variation with Cynar instead of Campari. I bet it is good..

I like it bitter – but i also like it sweet and so i`m moving on to a sweet variation in a while.

Way too many bars serves twists on the original recipe that changes the drink very much but they still call those drinks just Mai Tai – like the original Mai Tai and that`s just WRONG.

So here´s the sweet one, using homemade hibiscus grenadine instead of orange curacao and rhum agricole blanc.

HIBISCUS QUEEN


1 oz rhum agricole blanc

1 oz Smith & Cross Jamaican rum

1 oz lime juice (save the spent lime shell to go in the shaker)

¾ oz orgeat

0.5 oz hibiscus grenadine

A couple dashes hibiscus tincture (steep dried hibiscus flowers in highproof vodka for 1-2 weeks) on top of the ice. Or by all means, use peychauds.

Shake it up and strain into a tall glass or a hurricane glass (double the recipe) with crushed ice and top the ice with hibiscus tincture (or peychauds) garnish with a red hibiscus flower bud and stick a straw through it.

So by just adding hibiscus grenadine and switching the aged agricole for a blanc it turns out a different drink. Often you only need small changes to transform the drink into something entirely different.

But other times there´s bigger changes…here is another quite interesting variation called Stormy Mai Tai that uses lots of angostura bitters that i found over at Cocktail Quest.

Another interesting post on the subject Mai Tai as foundation you can read over at Chemistry of the Cocktail.

Now on to another very interesting twist, this one was created by my friend Tony Harion from Mixing Bar in Brazil. He uses Brazil nut orgeat and cachaca. Since i can´t get the cachaca he used since it´s not available outside of Brazil i used another VERY good cachaca – Abelha Gold.

UAI TAI – (pronounce it “woai tai”)

1 oz dark Jamaican rum

1 oz oak aged cachaça

0,5 oz Cointreau

0,5 – 0,75  oz lime muddled

0,5 – 0,75  oz Orgeat do Pará or Brazil Nut Orgeat

 

Tony`s instructions:

Muddle lime in the base of a shaker, add other ingredients and proceed like you would in a regular Mai Tai. Garnish with a mint sprig and a lot of love.

For the Orgeat do Pará, use Rick’s (Kaiserpenguin) Orgeat recipe but sub the almonds for Brazil nuts. The orange flower water can be left out.

Switching out the almonds and adding the cachaça brings a whole new character to the drink. The aromatic oils on the Brazil Nuts float to the top and transport you straight to the mountains of Minas Gerais in one snif.

Uai (pronounced jus like “why”) is a very popular slang in Minas and could mean pretty much anything. After three of these I’m sure you’ll understand what it means.

 

I really like the Ua Tai…it has an exotic flavor..and earthiness from the cachaca.

So what do you think about the original Mai Tai and in doing variations? where is the thin line? when does it become a bastardization?

 

Sugarcane bar

 

http://www.braindumps.com/VCPVCD510.htm  http://www.test-king.com/exams/642-437.htm www.actualtests.com  http://www.certkiller.com/exam-C_TSCM62_65.htm  http://www.juniper.net/